Information and Forms

Information for Students

How is college different from high school for students with disabilities?

How is college different from high school for students with disabilities?

High School
Higher Education (college)
Overall Guiding Principle: Your parents and teachers have much responsibility for your success. You have a right to a high school education and a diploma. The law under which this is done is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
Overall Guiding Principle: You are responsible for your own success or
failure. You have an equal opportunity to
achieve a college degree. The laws under
which this is done are Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act (504) and the Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA).
Accommodations: Teachers or other school staff identifies you as needing accommodations. Accommodations are generally arranged during an annual meeting and are taken care of for you on an on-going basis.
Accommodations: You, the student, must identify yourself and present documents to justify specific accommodations. As soon as you enroll in your next semester classes, it is your responsibility to notify the Disability Services Office in which classes you will need assistance.
Information about the Role of Parents: Parents are responsible to make sure the school is accommodating you properly. Parents may have any information the school has about your disability and the services provided to you.
Information about the Role of Parents: Your parents are no longer responsible to make sure you are being accommodated. This is now your responsibility both to initiate and to make the appropriate office aware if you are not accommodated. The institution of higher education must have your permission (in writing) before your parents may obtain any information about you or your services.
Confidentiality: Your disability will be discussed with your parents, teachers, and members of your IEP or 504 plan. It may also be discussed with the person who diagnoses your disability and specifies accommodations.
Confidentiality: Your disability information is covered by Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the student right to privacy act. It may not be discussed even with your parents without your written permission. Your disability and appropriate accommodations will only be disclosed to your instructors if you give permission in writing.
Feedback on Your Academic Progress: Teachers give you frequent feedback. Teachers check your complete homework. Teachers will approach you if they believe you need assistance. Teachers take time to remind you of assignments and due dates. Teachers remind you of your incomplete work and may give extensions on due dates of missing work.
Feedback on your Academic Progress: You must ask the instructor for feedback. Professors may not always check your homework, but they will assume you can perform the same tasks on tests. Professors are usually open and helpful, but most expect you to initiate contact or find a tutor if you need help. Professors expect you to use the syllabus they give you early in the semester and know the due dates except for documented emergencies. Professors may not remind you of your incomplete work and generally do not extend due dates.
Studying: Guiding Principle: you are told in class what you need to learn from assigned readings. You spend 30 hours a week in classes, and may only spend as little as 1 – 2 hours outside of class studying. You are expected to read short assignments that are then discussed, and often re-taught, in class.
Studying: Guiding Principle: It is up to you to read and understand the assigned material; the lectures and assignments proceed from the assumption that you have done so. You spend 12 – 16 hours a week in class, but you need to study at least that many hours outside of class. Some difficult courses will require 10 – 20 hours per week studying outside of class. You are assigned a substantial amount of reading and writing which may not be directly discussed in class, but will likely appear on a quiz or a test.
Tests and Grades: Testing is frequent and covers small amounts of material such as a chapter or unit. Makeup tests are often available. In grading, standards for grading may be changed, or credit may be given for a partial assignment or for effort. Mastery is seen as the ability to reproduce what you were taught.
Tests and Grades: Testing is usually infrequent and may be cumulative, covering large amounts of material, which you have to organize. Read the syllabus. If makeup tests are available, (and that is rare) you usually need to negotiate them prior to the test date, and make your own arrangements in advance for testing accommodations if you are entitled to them. Grading standards will not be changed, and credit is rarely given for effort. Mastery is seen as the ability to apply what you learned to a new situation and solve new problems or provide unique examples.
Documentation

Suggestions for Comprehensive Documentation

When requesting documentation from your evaluator, make sure of the following items:

  • The information is specific and complete. This will expedite the review of your request.
  • The person providing your information should link assessment reports to specific recommendations and reasonable accommodations. We strongly suggest that evaluators offer concrete examples to help support service decisions and recommendations. 
  • Ask questions of your evaluator if you do not understand your diagnosis or condition. Ask specific questions about why the recommendations are made and how they will help you. The more you understand about your disability, you can help others assist you in your requests.

Students must apply for accommodations every semester.
Complete a request form as soon as you enroll for classes, and AT LEAST one month prior to the start of each semester.

Contents of evaluation

  • An accurate description of your strengths and weaknesses 
  • A specific diagnostic statement 
  • Documentation of previous services 
  • Documentation of previous assessment results 
  • A list of all tests used in the evaluation 
  • An interpretation of the results of all tests (including specific recommendations) 
  • A specific statement of all areas of deficit and how they affect the individual's educational settings 
  • A specific statement of the impact of the disability in adult settings for social interactions and how the individual's strengths may offset this impact
  • A listing of specific instructional strategies and accommodations the individual requires

Avila University will make the final determination about your accommodations based on the information provided. 

A List of Instructions

Instructions

To apply for accommodations due to a disability, students need to do the following:

First Time Applicants (including students who need temporary accommodations)

  • Complete Accommodations Application 
  • Complete Student Information Sheet 
  • Copy supporting documentation 
  • Copy course schedule (if already enrolled) 
  • Call 816.501.3666 to schedule an appointment to review accommodation needs, sign agreements, and review course schedules to ensure accommodation needs are met 
  • Mail all of the above at least two weeks before the scheduled meeting to allow time for review of the information:

Disability Services

Avila University

11901 Wornall Road

Kansas City, MO 64145-1698

Returning Students – No Changes in Accommodations

  • Complete Accommodations Application 
  • Copy course schedule 
  • Call 816.501.3666 to schedule an appointment to review accommodation needs, sign agreements, and review course schedules to ensure accommodation needs are met

Returning Students – Requesting Changes in Accommodations

  • Complete Accommodations Application 
  • Copy course schedule 
  • Copy new supporting documentation 
  • Call 816.501.3666 to schedule an appointment to review accommodation needs, sign agreements, and review course schedules to ensure accommodation needs are met
  • Mail all of the above at least one week before the scheduled meeting to allow time for review of the information:

Disability Services

Avila University

11901 Wornall Road

Kansas City, MO 64145-1698

Returning Students Who Need to Submit Interpreter Request Forms

  • Complete the online Interpreter Request Form at least four business days before you need an interpreter – all fields must be complete to process your request
  • Your submitted request will be sent to the Disability Services office, and you will be notified when an interpreter has been arranged
  • If you need to change your request, please notify our office at least two business days in advance

New Students or Guests Who Need an Interpreter

  • Please contact Disability Services to make arrangements. You can call us at 816.501.3666
  • Or email us at DSO@avila.edu

NOTE: Parking Stickers are arranged through Campus Safety located in Whitfield. Campus Safety may be reached at 816.501.2425

Unsure how to proceed?

How to Proceed

First Time Applicants (including students who need temporary accommodations)

Please fill out the Student Information Form below. This information must be completed by:

  • First-time students requesting Accommodations 
    - AND/OR - 
  • Students who need to update their information

and it must be returned with complete documentation of disability. If you do not want to use this online form you may view, save, and/or print a copy of the PDF form here.

 

Returning Students – No Changes in Accommodations

Please fill out the Accommodations Form below. An application must be submitted each semester for all students requesting services. If you do not want to use this online form you may view, save, and/or print a copy of the PDF form here.

 

Returning Students – Requesting Changes in Accommodations

Please fill out the Accommodations Form below. An application must be submitted each semester for all students requesting services. If you do not want to use this online form you may view, save, and/or print a copy of the PDF form here.

 

Returning Students Who Need to Submit Interpreter Request Forms

Please fill out the Interpreter Request Form. If you do not want to use this online form you may view, save, and/or print a copy of the PDF form here.

 

New Students or Guests Who Need an Interpreter

Please contact Disability Services at 816.501.3666 or DSO@avila.edu to make arrangements.

Note: Parking stickers are arranged through the Campus Safety Office located in the Whitfield. The Campus Safety Office can be reached by calling 816.501.2425.

Information for Parents

A Parent's Guide to College

A Parent's Guide to College

About College
College life poses different challenges for students with disabilities. When students enroll in college, they are considered responsible adults by faculty and staff. The expectations are that they will assume responsibilities for meeting their class requirements. 

This added responsibility is coupled with a change in environment. Whereas the high school was a very structured environment with a set schedule, college schedules can vary dramatically. For the first time, students may have considerable time between classes and frequently do not use this time wisely. Students must enforce their own attendance policies and realize personal consequences if they choose not to attend class.

Is your child ready to assume responsibilities? If not, how will s/he learn these responsibilities? 

Self-Advocacy
Another student responsibility is that of self-advocate. Students must become adept at realistically assessing and understanding their strengths, weaknesses, needs, and preferences. Also, they must become experts at communicating these to other adults including instructors and service providers. Although services will be available to them through an office specializing in services for students with disabilities, often called the Disability Services Office (DSO) office, students will be responsible for seeking these services and support. Good communication skills and knowledge about oneself become crucial to success in college. How well does your child describe disability information? How well does your child self-advocate? 

The list below contrasts services offered at the high school level and college. 

Comparison of Services
High school and college are very different. 
Consider these differences and their importance to your child.

High School
College
Services are delivered to the student
Student must seek out services
Services are based on an agreed upon time allotment and menu of choices
Services are based on situational/individual needs
Case managers act as advocates
Student acts as advocate
Annual review & IEP
No annual review or IEP
Regular parent contact
No parent contact
Entitlement law (IDEA)
Anti-discrimination law (ADA)
Education and psychology tested in provided
Documentation must be provided by the student

Setting Demands  
Keep in mind that the college demands will be different and often greater than in high school. These demands include the need for greater organizational skills, assertiveness, and use of self-advocacy skills. Students must be prepared to handle a complicated course schedule and make more time for studying and completing assignments. Mastering learning strategies and study techniques will make college coursework more manageable. Because adults will not be seeking out the students to offer assistance, students cannot be shy about asking for help. How solid are your child's study and test taking skills? 

How to Lend Support  
You can support your child entering the college setting in a number of ways. First, be knowledgeable about the rights and responsibilities your son/daughter has under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Your son/daughter is responsible for using the information. Prior to enrollment, make sure that your son/daughter has all the paperwork and documentation needed to obtain services. Once you have gathered the necessary paperwork, make copies and turn it over to your son/daughter as the first step toward he/she assuming responsibility (make sure that you keep a copy in a safe place). 

Further Support
Beyond taking care of paperwork, consider these steps:

  1. Encourage the development and use of self-advocacy skills;
  2. Help your son/daughter understand disability;
  3. Talk about your son/daughter's disability comfortably. Once your son/daughter has a class schedule, discuss how his/her strengths and weaknesses will be effected by each class and what kinds of services s/he might need in order to be successful;
  4. Once the semester is underway, ask questions about progress, but remember that your son/daughter is ultimately responsible for his/her success;
  5. Listen and ask questions when you sense a problem is occurring;
  6. Realize that the coursework will be more difficult and time consuming than during high school;
  7. If your son/daughter is living at home, make sure he/she has a quiet place to study and ample time to finish assignments.

Parents’ Rights
Your child is considered an adult at the age of 18. You will no longer have access to your child’s records, unless your child chooses to share information with you. You cannot call the school and get
updates on your child.

Suggestions for Comprehensive Documentation

Suggestions for Comprehensive Documentation

When requesting documentation from your evaluator, make sure of the following items:

  • The information is specific and complete. This will expedite the review of your request.
  • The person providing your information should link assessment reports to specific recommendations and reasonable accommodations. We strongly suggest that evaluators offer concrete examples to help support service decisions and recommendations. 
  • Ask questions of your evaluator if you do not understand your diagnosis or condition. Ask specific questions about why the recommendations are made and how they will help you. The more you understand about your disability, you can help others assist you in your requests.

Students must apply for accommodations every semester.
Complete a request form as soon as you enroll for classes, and AT LEAST one month prior to the start of each semester.

Contents of evaluation

  • An accurate description of your strengths and weaknesses 
  • A specific diagnostic statement 
  • Documentation of previous services 
  • Documentation of previous assessment results 
  • A list of all tests used in the evaluation 
  • An interpretation of the results of all tests (including specific recommendations) 
  • A specific statement of all areas of deficit and how they affect the individual's educational settings 
  • A specific statement of the impact of the disability in adult settings for social interactions and how the individual's strengths may offset this impact. 
  • A listing of specific instructional strategies and accommodations the individual requires. 

Avila University will make the final determination about your accommodations based on the information provided. 

Forms

Student Information Form

Student Information Form

This information must be completed by 

  • First-time students requesting accommodations 
    - AND/OR - 
  • Students who need to update their information

and it must be returned with complete documentation of disability. If you do not want to use this online form you may view, save, and/or print a copy of the PDF form here.

Student InformationPlease fill out the following personal information to the best of your ability

I am currently receiving information/assistance from (check all that apply):

Name of counselor/agency contact:(Note: This is only required when you have selected at least one of the first three agencies previously listed):

Medical InformationProper and current documentation of student's disability must accompany this form.

Emergency Contact Information

Signature(Note: The date and time of submission will be recorded automatically)

Accommodations Request Form

Accommodations Application

An application must be submitted each semester for all students requesting services. If you do not want to use this online form you may view, save, and/or print a copy of the PDF form here. Fields with an asterisk are required.

Permanent Home Address:

Campus or Local Address:

Emergency Information

Check All That Apply:

Signature

Interpreter Request Form

Interpreter Request Form

If you do not want to use this online form you may view, save, and/or print a copy of the PDF form here. Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required. 

The Avila Promise

  • Lower Tuition Rate
  • Tuition Protection
  • 4-Year Graduation Guarantee
  • Internship or Research Guarantee
  • up to $1,000 Travel Award

 

That’s the Avila Promise.

Get Ahead with The Avila Summer Promise

avila summer promise

summer promise

Are you an incoming freshman or transfer student? Learn more about how the Avila Summer Promise can help you get ahead.
> Learn more

Adult & Graduate Open House

adult learner in learning commons

adult learner in learning commons
Thursday, July 19, 2018
Goppert Theatre Lobby
4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
> RSVP for the Open House 

Admission & Aid: Transfer Students, Enroll Now!

transfer studentsAre you looking to transfer to Avila for the fall? 
Sign up for an advising appointment to land the best class options and course times!

 

AU News

Avila University - SOAR 2018