List of Courses

Courses Offered

View Course Descriptions in Academic Catalog

HI 201. Ancient History and Culture. (3)

Using culture (i.e., the arts) as the central category of historical analysis, this course is a global history of human experience from ca. 3500 BCE to 1450 CE.  In each major unit of the course, students will analyze cultural artifacts to excavate the significance of culture (i.e., the arts) as a reflection of and reaction to the development of power relations (i.e., political, economic, social, or gender hierarchies) and the impact of transnational forces (i.e., global networks of trade, war, ideas, or human migration) in diverse cultures and societies over time in world history. Meets the lower-division requirement for World history in the major. PRE-2015 CORE-II. History.  2015 CORE: Creativity and Culture, Acquire; Global Studies.

 

HI 202. Modern History and Culture. (3)

Using culture (i.e., the arts) as the central category of historical analysis, this course is a global history of human experience from ca.1450 CE to the present. In each major unit of the course, students will analyze cultural artifacts to excavate the significance of culture (i.e., the arts) as a reflection of and reaction to the development of power relations (i.e., political, economic, social, or gender hierarchies) and the impact of transnational forces (i.e., global networks of trade, war, ideas, or human migration) in diverse cultures and societies over time in world history. Meets the lower-division requirement for World history in the major. PRE-2015 CORE-II. History.  2015 CORE: Creativity and Culture, Acquire; Global Studies.

 

HI 203. American Experience I. (3)

This course is a survey of American social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the first European settlements to 1865, with emphasis on the experiences of Native Americans, colonization, independence, nation building, reform, and slavery. Meets the lower-division requirement for American history in the history major. PRE-2015 CORE-II. History.  2015 CORE: Social Justice and Civic Life, Acquire.

 

HI 204. American Experience II. (3)

This course is a survey of major political, social, cultural, and economic changes in United States history from 1865 to the present, with emphasis on the development of industrial society, consumerism, the expanding role of the United States in world affairs, as well as civil rights and other social movements. Meets the lower division requirement for American history in the history major. PRE-2015 CORE-II. History.  2015 CORE: Social Justice and Civic Life, Acquire.

 

HI 280. Topics in History. (1-3)

This course is a survey of specific historical problems, debates, or periods in American or World history using current methodologies.

 

HI 304. History Study Tour. (1-3)

This course involves directed study of a particular historical period, event, theme, or topic conducted on-site in the United States or abroad in a foreign country. Restricted to history majors and minors.  Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

 

HI/WS 311. American Women. (3)

This course explores changing cultural images of women, examines the role of gender in structuring American society, and compares the experiences of American women from a variety of racial and ethnic groups as well as class positions.  Additionally, this course includes a discussion of important theoretical and methodological concerns related to women’s and gender history.  Meets the upper-division requirement for American history in the history major.  2015 CORE: Social Justice and Civic Life, Contribute.

 

HI 312. African-American History. (3)

A survey of the African-American experience in North America, the course examines the evolution of slavery and racism, the methods and movements of resistance, and the creation of African-American communities and cultures from the colonial period to the present. The course stresses African-American agency in shaping their own lives and the history of the United States.  Meets the upper-division requirement for American history in the history major.

 

HI 321. Revolutionary Era America. (3)

From the emergence of English colonial communities to riots, rebellions, and the War for Independence, the course examines the causes and consequences of revolution and the perils of nation-building. Meets the upper-division requirement for American history in the history major.

 

HI 327. American Frontiers. (3)

This course will examine American history from a variety of perspectives and will interrogate the limits and margins of culture. We will study the concept of the frontier both literally and metaphorically, and thus will cast a critical gaze on the geographic, historical, and ideological margins of American society. The course will consider the role of race, class, gender, religion, and other identity categories in the constitution of “the margins” of American culture in the past and present. We will investigate such topics as religious extremism, cultural diversity, and political extremism in order to challenge definitions of the “mainstream” but also to highlight cultural shifts. Meets the upper-division requirement for American history in the history major.  2015 CORE: Belief and Reason, Contribute.

 

HI 329. American Slavery & the Slave Trade. (3)

This course begins with the historical roots of U.S. slavery in the ancient world and West Africa. It covers the Indian slave trade, the Atlantic slave trade, as well as the domestic slave trade. This course will address the diverse policies and practices of slavery and anti-slavery in the U.S. during the colonial, revolutionary, early Republic, antebellum, and Civil War eras. Comparisons with other regions in the western hemisphere will also be offered. Finally, this course will investigate the legacy of slavery in the modern day United States. Meets the upper-division requirement for American history in the history major. 2015 CORE: Social Justice and Civic Life, Transform.

 

HI 330. American Empires. (3)

This course focuses on imperialism and colonialism in the Americas. Beginning with the establishment of European empires to U.S. expansion in the 19th century, as well as current debates about expansion and globalization, this class foregrounds the contributions of multiple racial/ethnic groups in forming American culture. Meets the upper-division requirement for American history in the history major.  2015 CORE: Belief and Reason, Contribute.

 

HI/WS 332.  Sex and Sexuality in America. (3)

This course examines the history of sex and sexuality in America from pre-colonial Native societies to the modern-day. This class uncovers the ways that ideas of sex and sexuality have changed over time and the impact of constructions of gender and sexuality on marginalized groups with the United States and in a global context. Meets the upper-division requirement for American history in the history major.  2015 CORE: Belief & Reason, Contribute.

 

HI 365.  The German Fatherland. (3)

This course explores the transformation of the German-speaking lands from an ambiguous cultural patchwork of feudal lands to a unified, industrial, and culturally diverse empire in the period from 1780 to 1914. Using culture as a central category of historical analysis, special attention is given to the dynamic relationship between German national identity (“the German Fatherland”) and supposed outsiders in German society, such as workers, women, and Jews. Meets the upper-division requirement for World history in the history major. 2015 CORE: Creativity and Culture, Contribute.

 

HI 366. The Spectre of Nazism. (3)

This course explores the history of Germany from 1914 to the present, a troubled odyssey of war, revolution, genocide, and reunification. Using culture as a central category of historical analysis, special attention is given to the cultural responses to the changing political landscapes of the German Empire during World War I (1914-1918), the Weimar Republic (1919-1933), Nazi Germany (1933-1945), occupied Germany (1945-1949), the Cold War German states (1949-1990), and reunified Germany since 1990. Meets the upper-division requirement for World history in the history major. 2015 CORE: Creativity and Culture, Contribute.

 

HI 368. Red Utopia. (3)

Using culture (especially popular culture) as the central category of historical analysis, this course explores the transformation of Russian society during the Soviet Union (1917-1991) in its effort to create a “New Soviet Human Being” and, thus, a revolutionary, communist utopia. Meets the upper-division requirement for World history in the history major. 2015 CORE: Creativity and Culture, Contribute.

 

HI/WS 370. Fairy Tales and Culture. (3)

This course is an exploration of the creation, transmission, and implications of culture to power relations (particularly gender) of fairy tales in modern world history since 1450 C.E. in a global context. Meets both the upper-division requirement for World history and communication intensive requirement in the history major. 2015 CORE: Creativity and Culture, Contribute.

 

HI 371. The Holocaust. (3)

This course is a detailed analysis of the Holocaust (1933-1945).  In particular, this course is an examination of two major issues in history:  1) the major historiographical issues in understanding the Holocaust as a historical event and 2) the issue of historical memory and representation of the Holocaust, such as that found in survivor testimony, literature, documentary films, and memorials.  Meets the upper-division requirement for World history in the major. 2015 CORE: Social Justice and Civic Life, Transform.

 

HI 372.  The Great War. (3)

Using visits to the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial in Kansas City as a central focus, this course is a survey of the origins, experiences, historiographical controversies, and legacies of the First World War (1914-1918) in a global context. Meets the upper-division requirement for World history in the history major.  2015 CORE: Social Justice and Civic Life, Acquire; Global Studies.

 

HI 380. Topics in History. (3)

This course involves study of specific historical problems, debates, or periods in American or World history using current methodologies.

 

HI 396. Public History. (3)

This course is an introduction to public history, which includes museum administration, archival collection, historic preservation, heritage tourism, oral history, and cultural resource management. Students will examine the theoretical foundations and traditions of public history as a genre of historical inquiry and analyze the major historical debates surrounding public history in general. Building on this foundation, students will then create a synthesis of academic learning and community engagement with the completion of a case study and internship based the needs of a community partner, such as the National World War I Museum at the Liberty Memorial or other local public history site approved by the instructor.  Meets the upper-division requirement (American or World) in the major. Prerequisite: Instructor Approval. 2015 CORE: Civic Engagement.

 

HI 399. Historical Methods. (3)

This seminar is a research methodologies course that will help prepare students for more advanced work and careers in the field of history. The course will focus on what historians do and how they do it. To that end, the course will help students to develop critical thinking and research skills, plan for careers after graduation, and have a better understand of the discipline as a whole. Furthermore, students will also learn about integrating technology into the practice of history and the place of technology in the future of historical work. PRE-2015 CORE: Meets the communication intensive requirement in the major.  PRE-2015 and 2015 CORE: Students must complete this course at Avila University in order to fulfill the University Functional Computer Literacy/Technology requirement in the major.

 

HI 490. Directed Study in History. (1-3)

This course involves directed study of a particular historical period, event, theme, or topic. Restricted to history majors and minors.  Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

 

HI 496. Internship in History. (3)

The course involves participation in the activities of a historical agency or in a public history research project, under supervision of a faculty member or supervisor designated by the faculty. Restricted to history majors and minors. Prerequisite: Instructor approval and HI 396 Public History.  2015 CORE: Civic Engagement.

 

HI 499. Senior Thesis. (3)

Building on the foundation of “knowledge” and “theory” gained from upper-level history courses, this capstone seminar in the history major challenges advanced students to pose a historical question based on primary sources, provide a historical context for this research using current secondary literature, and then produce a well-written work and verbal presentation of historical scholarship. Lastly, students enrolled in this course will create an electronic portfolio that serves as the departmental comprehensive examination in the major of history. Meets the capstone course requirement in the major and must be completed at Avila University. Prerequisite: HI 399 Historical Methods.

 

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