BE INSPIRED

to be more.

We do more than educate.

WE INSPIRE.

We do more than

educate.

We inspire.

We want to

INSPIRE YOU

to do great things.

Robert Powell

powell
In Costa Rica with Leptophis
in hand.


Teaching Philosophy

Teaching Philosophy

Robert Powell, Ph.D.

Rhinoceros Iguana (Cyclura cornuta) from Parque Nacional Isla Cabritos, República Dominicana

My teaching philosophy is best summarized as a composite of three basic statements: (1) an effective teacher must provide students with the opportunity to acquire, practice, and receive reinforcement of fundamental knowledge and skills; (2) a good teacher encourages students to think, not to accept information passively, but to question, analyze, and test via applications of newly acquired knowledge; and (3) outstanding teachers design courses of instruction which provide students with both realistic challenges and opportunities for success.

In the sciences in particular, students must acquire a working knowledge of the fundamental principles and associated terminology of a given area. Much of this material must be memorized. Yet despite patterns often heavily reinforced in primary, secondary, and (sadly) post-secondary education, rote memorization and subsequent regurgitation of “facts and jargon” should not dominate even this most fundamental stage of learning. The “facts and jargon” must be presented in a highly organized manner, showing the necessary connections, but without overwhelming the student with quantity at any one time. I believe that this presentation can be facilitated by providing students with information on etymology. A familiarity with word roots, suffixes, and prefixes can eliminate the need to memorize separately seemingly endless lists of essential words. Also incorporated into the overall process must be instruction and reinforcement of related skills, notably the communication skills of reading, listening, and writing. The student must be shown how to effectively use textual materials, how to listen to a lecture, how to write (from notes in class to assigned essays and topics papers), and how to orally communicate in a concise and accurate manner. The biology instructor should not assume the role of language professor, but must reinforce those lessons in the context of his or her discipline. The extent to which this approach is required will vary according to the level of instruction, becoming progressively less important, but never to the point of omission, as one moves from introductory level courses through upper-division courses to graduate instruction. 

Even high levels of competence in mastering fundamental principles are of little value if application is lacking. Even in beginning courses students shall have the opportunity to connect ideas; knowing definitions of population, species, and evolution, for example, is meaningless if the student cannot apply these terms and related concepts to the realities that characterize these entities and phenomena in nature. The instructor must allow opportunities for processing and experiencing these applications.

Higher-level thinking skills, notably integration, analysis, and decision-making must be explained, modeled, and practiced. Further, these activities (and these are active processes) must be encouraged both within and beyond the immediate confines of a discipline. This is almost always best accomplished in the biological sciences by letting and encouraging (and occasionally forcing) the student to get his or her hands dirty — in the laboratory or in the field (computer simulations are wonderful tools and should be used, but not to the exclusion of the real world). Learning about populations, for example, is little more than an academic exercise without the experience of seeing and comparing, much less measuring and analyzing, actual communities. Books and lectures can only complement nature.

In terms of implementation, the statements above mean that effective teaching must be multi-faceted. I have had the opportunity over the years and in a variety of settings to explore many methods and techniques. Some are suitable only with the small class sizes I typically encounter at Avila, but many are applicable in any situation. In presenting the “facts and jargon” necessary to establish a knowledge base, I try to use tools that appeal to a variety of learning styles. Traditional lectures are frequently the most efficient means of presenting large quantities of information and work well when dealing with auditory learners. Lectures work especially well when they are well-organized and presented in a dynamic fashion (using humor, gestures, intonation, real and preferably personal examples). Students wake up to stories, especially if the instructor is the butt of a joke or the victim of a humorous anecdote. An instructor also gains credibility when able to cite from personal experience applications of the ideas being discussed (this is the main reason science should be taught by scientists, not just teachers who know about science but have never experienced the process). However, visual learners require and even auditory learners benefit from seeing materials. Fortunately, many tools are available to address this need, from writing or drawing on a blackboard or using overheads or transparencies to films and videos and even actual specimens (few classes have more impact than those during which I present a snake or an owl or a raccoon to illustrate form and related function of an organism). Recently, the development of interactive video technology has made available new possibilities, in which a visual presentation is accompanied by an opportunity for each student to apply information and draw conclusions. Ultimately, however, the best learning experiences come from hands-on opportunities. For tactile learners this is essential, and students with preferences for any learning modality benefit. In biology classes, these hands-on experiences should take place in the lab or field, depending on the specific subject.

Development of higher-level thinking skills (“making connections”) also may be approached in a variety of ways. Opportunities to discuss ideas and applications are essential for reinforcing knowledge. Especially for purposes of modeling the necessary give-and-take of effective discussions, some exchanges are appropriate in the lecture hall, with guidance from the instructor. Often, however, small group discussions on selected readings from the popular or primary literature are very useful, and serve to involve the student who might never contribute in a larger group. Socratic exchanges are essential, in either the context of answering specific questions or as a part of informal exchanges in laboratory or field settings. Written assignments are also appropriate and necessary, particularly when comparing dissenting views on a controversial subject or analyzing the processes leading to new interpretations. These exercises are only of value, however, if the students have the tools necessary to accomplish the stated goals. These tools are primarily skills in thinking and communication, and my previous comments regarding the presentation, modeling, and practice of these skills apply. Biology relies so heavily on a composite of fundamental concepts from different disciplines that it provides an ideal vehicle for developing in students the intellectual ability to make connections. For these reasons, the curriculum at Avila requires that all biology majors take a course in evolution, ecology, or systematics, courses in which connections are fundamental rather than facultative.

Also, as learning is an incremental process during which the student builds on a known foundation by making connections with new, previously unknown, but related information and skills, frequent feedback is essential. Quality instruction must provide for such feedback, initially under circumstances entailing limited risk. Feedback and evaluation often are linked. To provide both in the context of examinations, I believe frequent tests are necessary (no fewer than four per semester in undergraduate classes). This minimizes the risk associated with an individual evaluation while providing feedback necessary to successfully (hopefully) address deficiencies before the next such event. In instances involving oral or written assignments, students should have the opportunity for a “dry run,” a practice presentation that is critiqued, but not graded, or a rough draft upon which comments and suggestions are made, but which also is not graded. Furthermore, any assignment submitted by a student deserves commentary relevant to the relationship between the instructor's expectations and the student's performance, preferably of a positive nature, but in all instances accurate and timely. 

Minimizing risk and providing frequent feedback enhances the student's opportunity for success. A challenge is provided by the necessity of meeting expectations set forth by the instructor. These expectations may be either of a purely academic nature or skill-related, but are often combinations of both. Meeting the challenge shall be rewarded with a passing grade, meeting the challenge in an exemplary fashion shall be rewarded with a high grade. Students must earn grades in order to correlate success with the self-esteem that is derived from working hard, overcoming obstacles, and producing a product worthy of reward. All students should have this chance, but rewards must be meaningful in order to be credible and valid.

Finally, I believe deeply in the concept that students learn best about science by doing science. In an introductory course, this may be simulated through discussion, written assignments, or laboratory exercises. In upper-division and graduate classes the experiences must be real. “Getting your hands dirty” goes beyond the need to address a particular learning style, real questions must be asked, realistic solutions offered, and students must have a chance to choose from options based on their own experiences. I cannot imagine an ecology class, for example, during which no original data are generated, analyzed, and used to draw conclusions. I see investigative components as vital elements in nearly all biology courses. Research itself is, of course, at the very heart of science. Promising undergraduates and all graduate students must do science (research) in their preparation for careers in science. Instruction in research, as in a classroom, must make provisions for this need, with all the opportunities for feedback, “dry runs,” and success mentioned above. Specific methods may vary, maybe conversation rather than structured discussions or analysis of data and results rather than examinations, but in the context of higher education, research performed even by advanced students (and faculty) should be a learning process; and students involved in research should have their expectations for guidance rewarded. 

In summary, an instructor must challenge students while simultaneously providing them with opportunities for success as they learn to “do science” by establishing a knowledge base, applying that knowledge and related skills to real and simulated situations, and ultimately conceiving, designing, and implementing a research project.

Copyright © 2003 by Robert Powell. Last revised: November 28, 2005

Research Interests

Research Interests

Critically endangered Cyclura ricordii from Parque Nacional Isla Cabritos, República Dominicana

Since 1986 my research interests have been focused primarily on the West Indian herpetofauna. I have made nearly 60 trips to the West Indies, often accompanied by groups of undergraduates. The emphasis of most studies has been on life histories or community composition of amphibians and reptiles — predicated largely by my enthusiasm for those animals.

Lizard communities, particularly those on tropical and sub-tropical islands, are ideal models for studying life history traits and ecological relationships. West Indian lizards (as well as frogs and some snakes) often are phenomenally abundant and never cease to provide opportunities to ask new questions of what, how, and why. Also, very few studies have addressed the life histories of most species, rendering them particularly suitable for studies involving undergraduates.

Many aspects of life history can be ascertained through museum-based studies. For example, I am interested in what animals eat and when and how they reproduce. These basic bits of knowledge are best acquired through the examination of museum specimens. Because these types of studies also are capable of being completed in relatively short periods of time, I have guided many of the undergraduates with whom I have worked toward such investigations. Still, diets are only of passing interest until one can relate food habits to habitats and availability of prey. Similarly, reproductive information is most significant when cause-and-effect relationships can be established between patterns and/or modes of reproduction and climate and habitat. These latter connections obviously require a field component, which I attempt as frequently as possible (studying fascinating animals in a tropical paradise is a tough road to travel, but someone has to do it, and I’m willing to make the necessary sacrifices whenever possible).

When seeking answers to complex questions, new questions inevitably arise (that is the beauty of biology). Many are concerned with human-mediated alterations of habitats to which a few species readily adapt and in which they often thrive, but the very same alterations negatively affect most herpetofaunal populations.

Realization of my research goals has been affected by the heavy teaching loads expected of faculty at Avila University and by constraints imposed as a result of working exclusively with undergraduates. However, my involvement over many years with undergraduate research has resulted in gradually building a foundation upon which I can continue to address the real and fascinating questions that drew me to biology in the first place. In summary, my interests have led to studies in fascinating places and to investigations that will never cease to provide opportunities to ask new questions and explore any number of alternative explanations.

Essay: “On Being a Herpetologist at a Small, Private, Undergraduate College”

(This essay originally appeared in the Newsletter of the Herpetologists' League 5(1):5–6).

The unpleasant truth is that “herpetology” does not exist at small colleges. Instead, the herpetologist is considered to be just another biologist and may be asked to teach courses ranging from introductory biology to comparative anatomy, embryology, ecology, and evolution. Not that such a teaching load is all that onerous, but once exposed to the charms of amphibians and reptiles, it may be hard to revert to generic biology. Also, one must accept the reality that teaching is the primary responsibility of faculty at small colleges. As a result, teaching loads are heavy, with 12 credit hours per semester being the norm (and for science faculty the contact hours may be much higher due to laboratories). This, along with ancillary responsibilities such as advising, committee work, and attending meetings, leaves little time to devote to research, herpetological or otherwise. 

Now, having those unpleasantries out of the way, let me go on to say that “doing” herpetology at a small college is not impossible or even terribly difficult, assuming some diligence on the part of the faculty member, but constraints are real and must be acknowledged. Time is by far the most significant limitation, but minimal or nonexistent funding also presents problems. So, how does one “do” herpetology at a small school? 

Because many small colleges are tuition-driven, anything that attracts, involves, and retains students will be viewed in a favorable light by the powers-that-be. The obvious solution, then, is to engage students in herpetological pursuits. One of the most powerful “attractants” is the opportunity to participate in field trips. These need not be to exotic climes (although that's nice); as a matter of fact, local and regional trips are low cost, take relatively little time, and can open eyes to things most students have never experienced. Once students are engaged, reaching a critical number necessary to offer a herpetology class becomes much more likely. Another way to attract students is to reach into the community. Especially urban schools will find a sizable number of folks interested in “herps.” If classes are scheduled to accommodate working adults, these might add up in a manner sufficient to allow traditional students to participate as well. A welcome bonus accrues when “amateurs,” whose primary interest may have been watching a snake in a cage, become adequately sophisticated to participate in regional or national societies, the focus of which focus extends well beyond herpetoculture. 

Small colleges also appreciate good public relations. If space capable of housing some live amphibians and reptiles can be requisitioned or merely occupied, these animals can serve to attract prospective students in biology, but can also be used by faculty and/or students in educational programs at area schools and nature centers or for scouts and other outdoor groups. Our favorite animals do attract attention, and the publicity generated by such services reflects well on the college, the administration of which will, in turn, be more tolerant of herpetologically related activities. 

Real research is more difficult, but certainly not impossible. Again, the trick is to involve students. Many colleges have curricular options or requirements involving student research. Mentor students interested in herpetogical projects; this will help them better understand science and keep your own interests alive. Always keep in mind, however, that all but the most advanced undergraduates lack the sophistication to do long-term projects until they have little or no time left before graduation. Therefore, you must direct them toward “little” projects, although these may over time result in the accumulation of considerable data. Natural history and some aspects of taxonomy lend themselves to low-cost, short-term projects, albeit not cutting-edge science. Keep in mind, however, that these kinds of data are unavailable for many species, including a surprising number of common North American forms. Many larger institutions, universities and museums, will loan specimens for this work, allowing species otherwise not readily available to be the subject of student projects. However, the data are only as good as the collector, so the faculty member must commit precious time to training and supervising these research projects. If care is taken, the results of student projects may even be publishable. Undergraduate-authored or co-authored papers are a tremendous plus for students applying to competitive graduate programs, and they can provide “bragging rights” for college administrators interested in what their students and faculty are doing. 

Field research in exotic locales and more intensive research is also within the reach of faculty at small schools — if they are willing to invest the time and energy to acquire extramural funding. This is often difficult because the investigator may be competing with research institutions and dealing with peer review panels who have never heard of either the person or the institution. Applying to local or regional agencies and diligent attention to detail, taking full advantage of every available opportunity, and perseverance in the face of initial frustration can often overcome these obstacles, especially if the faculty member is willing to work with undergraduates and/or teachers, for whom dedicated funding programs exist and who many research institutions cannot reach as effectively as the smaller, more flexible college. 

So, being a herpetologist at a small college is tough, but it can be done and done well. However, hard work and accepting and dealing with obstacles is essential. Those lacking energy, imagination, commitment, and perseverance will soon become generic teachers of biology instead of active herpetologists.

Publications

Robert Powell, Ph.D.
Publications

(Undergraduate coauthors are indicated by bold type)

Rhinoceros Iguana (Cyclura cornuta) from Parque Nacional Isla Cabritos, República Dominicana 

BOOKS

Powell, R., R. Conant, and J. T. Collins. 2016. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 4th ed. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston, Massachusetts.

Powell, R., R. W. Henderson, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2015. The Reptiles and Amphibians of the Dutch Caribbean: Saba, St. Eustatius, and St. Maarten. 2nd ed., revised and expanded. Nature Guide Series No. 004. Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance, Kralendijk, Bonaire.

Powell, R., J. T. Collins, and E. D. Hooper, Jr. 2012. A Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada. 2nd ed., revised and updated. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence. 


Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2009. Natural History of West Indian Reptiles and Amphibians. University Press of Florida, Gainesville. 


Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell (eds.). 2007. The Biology of Boas and Pythons. Eagle Mountain Publishing LC, Eagle Mountain, Utah.  


Powell, R., R. W. Henderson, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2005. Reptiles and Amphibians of the Dutch Caribbean: St. Eustatius, Saba, and St. Maarten. St. Eustatius National Parks Foundation, Gallows Bay, St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. 


Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell (eds.). 2003. Islands and the Sea: Essays on Herpetological Exploration in the West Indies. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Contributions to Herpetology, volume 20. Ithaca, New York. 


Hodge, K. V. D., E. J. Censky, and R. Powell. 2003. The Reptiles and Amphibians of Anguilla, British West Indies. Anguilla National Trust, The Valley. 


Powell, R., J. T. Collins, and E. D. Hooper, Jr. 1998. A Key to the Amphibians and Reptiles of the Continental United States and Canada. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence.  


Powell, R. and R. W. Henderson (eds.). 1996. Contributions to West Indian Herpetology: A Tribute to Albert Schwartz.Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Contributions to Herpetology, volume 12. Ithaca, New York.  


BOOK CHAPTERS

  1. Powell, R. 1991. Reptiles, pp. 2361–2368. In: F. N. Magill (ed.), Magill's Survey of Science: Life Science. Salem Press, Pasadena, CA.
  2. Powell, R. 1991. Temperature regulation, pp. 2609–2616. In: F. N. Magill (ed.), Magill's Survey of Science: Life Science. Salem Press, Pasadena, CA.
  3. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 1996. A brief history of West Indian herpetology, pp. 29–50. In: R. Powell and R. W. Henderson (eds.), Contributions to West Indian Herpetology: A Tribute to Albert Schwartz. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Contributions to Herpetology, volume 12. Ithaca, New York.
  4. Powell, R., R. W. Henderson, K. Adler, and H. A. Dundee. 1996. An annotated checklist of West Indian amphibians and reptiles, pp. 51–93 + 8 pls. In: R. Powell and R. W. Henderson (eds.), Contributions to West Indian Herpetology: A Tribute to Albert Schwartz. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Contributions to Herpetology, volume 12. Ithaca, New York.
  5. Powell, R., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and D. D. Smith. 1996. Evidence of spatial niche partitioning by a Hispaniolan lizard community in a xeric habitat, pp. 317–326. In: R. Powell and R. W. Henderson (eds.), Contributions to West Indian Herpetology: A Tribute to Albert Schwartz.Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Contributions to Herpetology, volume 12. Ithaca, New York.
  6. Powell, R. 1999. Legends to color plates, pp. xxi–xxx + 8 pls. In: B. I. Crother (ed.), Caribbean Amphibians and Reptiles. Academic Press, San Diego, California.
  7. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 1999. West Indian herpetoecology, p. 223–268. In: B. I. Crother (ed.), Caribbean Amphibians and Reptiles. Academic Press, San Diego, California. 
  8. Powell, R., J. A. Ottenwalder, and S. J. Incháustegui. 1999. The Hispaniolan herpetofauna: Diversity, endemism, and historical perspectives, with comments on Navassa Island, pp. 93–168. In: B. I. Crother (ed.), Caribbean Amphibians and Reptiles. Academic Press, San Diego, California.
  9. Powell, R. 2001. Biogeography, pp. 114–116. In: C. W. Hoagstrom (ed.), Magill's Encyclopedia of Science: Animal Life. 4 volumes. Salem Press, Pasadena, California. 
  10. Powell, R. 2001. Fauna: Caribbean, pp. 546–548. In: C. W. Hoagstrom (ed.), Magill's Encyclopedia of Science: Animal Life. 4 volumes. Salem Press, Pasadena, California.
  11. Powell, R. 2001. Snakes, pp. 1520–1524. In: C. W. Hoagstrom (ed.), Magill's Encyclopedia of Science: Animal Life. 4 volumes. Salem Press, Pasadena, California.
  12. Powell, R. 2001. Turtles and tortoises, pp. 1622–1625. In: C. W. Hoagstrom (ed.), Magill's Encyclopedia of Science: Animal Life. 4 volumes. Salem Press, Pasadena, California. 
  13. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2003. Introduction, pp. 3–8. In: R. W. Henderson and R. Powell (eds.), Islands and the Sea: Essays on Herpetological Exploration in the West Indies. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Contributions to Herpetology, volume 20. Ithaca, New York.
  14. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2003. Some historical perspectives, pp. 9–20. In: R. W. Henderson and R. Powell (eds.), Islands and the Sea: Essays on Herpetological Exploration in the West Indies. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Contributions to Herpetology, volume 20. Ithaca, New York. 
  15. Powell, R. 2003. As good as it gets, pp. 169–183. In: R. W. Henderson and R. Powell (eds.), Islands and the Sea: Essays on Herpetological Exploration in the West Indies. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Contributions to Herpetology, volume 20. Ithaca, New York. 
  16. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2007. The biology of boas and pythons: A retrospective look to the future, pp. 2–22. In: R. W. Henderson and R. Powell (eds.), Biology of the Boas and Pythons. Eagle Mountain Publishing LC, Eagle Mountain, Utah. 
  17. Powell, S. B.M. L. Treglia, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2007. Treeboas in the West Indies: Responses of Corallus cookii and C. grenadensis to disturbed habitats, pp. 374–387. In: R. W. Henderson and R. Powell (eds.), Biology of the Boas and Pythons. Eagle Mountain Publishing LC, Eagle Mountain, Utah. 
  18. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2007. Urban herpetology in the West Indies, pp. 389–404. In: J. C. Mitchell, R. E. Jung Brown, and B. Bartholomew (eds.), Urban Herpetology. Herpetological Conservation, volume 3. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  19. Powell, R., R. W. Henderson, M. C. Farmer, M. Breuil, A. C. Echternacht, G. van Buurt, C. M. Romagosa, and G. Perry. 2011. Introduced amphibians and reptiles in the Greater Caribbean: Patterns and conservation implications, pp. 63–143. In: A. Hailey, B. S. Wilson, and J. A. Horrocks (eds.), Conservation of Caribbean Island Herpetofaunas. Volume 1: Conservation Biology and the Wider Caribbean. Brill, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  20. Hodge, K. V. D., R. Powell, and E. J. Censky. 2011. Conserving the herpetofauna of Anguilla, pp. 3–15. In: A. Hailey, B. S. Wilson, and J. A. Horrocks (eds.), Conservation of Caribbean Island Herpetofaunas. Volume 2: Regional Accounts of the West Indies. Brill, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  21. Powell, R., and S. J. Incháustegui. 2011. Conservation of the herpetofauna of the Dominican Republic, pp. 167–188. In: A. Hailey, B. S. Wilson, and J. A. Horrocks (eds.), Conservation of Caribbean Island Herpetofaunas. Volume 2: Regional Accounts of the West Indies. Brill, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  22. Powell, R. 2011. Conservation of the herpetofauna on the Dutch Windward Islands: St. Eustatius, Saba, and St. Maarten, pp. 189–204. In: A. Hailey, B. S. Wilson, and J. A. Horrocks (eds.), Conservation of Caribbean Island Herpetofaunas. Volume 2: Regional Accounts of the West Indies. Brill, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  23. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2011. The St. Vincent (Lesser Antilles) herpetofauna: Conservation concerns, pp. 359–376. In: A. Hailey, B. S. Wilson, and J. A. Horrocks (eds.), Conservation of Caribbean Island Herpetofaunas. Volume 2: Regional Accounts of the West Indies. Brill, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  24. Powell, R. 2011. Amphibians, pp. 63–64. In: C. W. Allin (ed.), Encyclopedia of Environmental Issues. Revised edition. Volume 1. Salem Press, Pasadena, California.
  25. Powell, R., R. W. Henderson, G. Perry, M. Breuil, and C. M. Romagosa. 2013. Introduced amphibians and reptiles in the Lesser Antilles, pp. 74–107. In: J.-L. Vernier and M. Burac (eds.), Biodiversité insulaire: la flore, la faune et l'homme dans les Petites Antilles. Actes du Colloque international, Schoelcher, 8–10 Novembre 2010. Direction de l'Environment, de l'Aménagement et du Logement de Martinique and Université de Antilles et de la Guyana, Schoelcher, Martinique.
  26. Henderson, R. W., R. Powell, J. Martín, and P. Lopez. 2016. Arboreal and fossorial reptiles, pp. 139–153. In: C. K. Dodd, Jr. (ed.), Reptile Ecology and Conservation. A Handbook of Techniques. Oxford University Press, New York.

REFEREED ARTICLES AND NOTES

  1. Allen, K. E., K. J. Avilés Rodríguez, D. A. Eifler, and R. Powell. 2015. Social and environmental factors influence microhabitat selection in the Brown-speckled Sphaero, Sphaerodactylus notatus (Squamata: Sphaerodactylidae). Journal of Herpetology 49: 165–169 (featured in Life Science Weekly, 4 August 2015: 2537).
  2. Allen, K. E., and R. Powell. 2014. Thermal biology and microhabitat use in Puerto Rican Eyespot Geckos (Sphaerodactylus macrolepis macrolepis). Herpetological Conservation and Biology 9: 590–600.
  3. Diamond, K., D. Trovillion, K. E. Allen, K. M. Malela, D. A. Noble, R. Powell, D. A. Eifler, and M. E. Gifford. 2014. Individual (co)variation of field behavior and locomotor performance in curly tailed lizards. Journal of Zoology 294: 248–254.
  4. Sever, D. M., S. J. Mullin, and R. Powell. 2014. Herpetological research at primarily undergraduate institutions. Herpetological Review 45: 409–413.
  5. Johnson, S. K., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., D. A. Eifler, and R. Powell. 2013. Comparative water-loss rates of Hemidactylus mabouia and Sphaerodactylus notatus on Eleuthera Island, Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Herpetology Notes 6: 471–475.
  6. Böhm, M., B. Collen, J. E. M. Baillie, J. Chanson, N. Cox, G. Hammerson, M. Hoffmann, S. R. Livingstone, M. Ram, A. G. J. Rhodin, S. N. Stuart, P. P. l. van Dijk, B. E. Young, L. E. Afuang, A. Aghasyan, A. G. Aguayo, C. Aguilar, R. Ajtic, F. Akarsu, L. R. V. Alencar, A. Allison, N. Ananjeva, S. Anderson, C. Andrén, D. Ariano-Sánchez, J. C. Arredondo, M. Auliya, C. C. Austin, A. Avci, P. J. Baker, A. F. Barreto-Lima, C. L. Barrio-Amorós, D. Basu, M. F. Bates, A. Batistella, A. Bauer, D. Bennett, W. Böhme, D. Broadley, R. Brown, J. Burgess, A. Captain, S. Carreira, M. Castaneda, F. Castro, A. Catenazzi, J. R. Cedeño-Vázquez, D. Chapple, M. Cheylan, D. F. Cisneros-Heredia, D. Cogalniceanu, H. Cogger, C. Corti, G. C. Costa, P. J. Couper, T. Courtney, J. Crnobrnja-Isailovic, P.-A. Crochet, B. Crother, F. Cruz, J. Daltry, R. J. R. Daniels, I. Das, A. de Silva, L. Dirksen, T. Doan, K. Dodd, J. S. Doody, M. E. Dorcas, J. Duarte de Barros Filho, V. T. Egan, E. H. El Mouden, D. Embert, R. E. Espinoza, A. Fallabrino, X. Feng, Z.-J. Feng, L. Fitzgerald, O. Flores-Villela, F. G. R. França, D. Frost, H. Gadsden, T. Gamble, S. R. Ganesh, M. A. Garcia, J. E. García-Pérez, J. Gatus, M. Gaulke, P. Geniez, A. Georges, J. Gerlach, S. Goldberg, J. C. T. Gonzalez, D. J. Gower, T. Grant, E. Greenbaum, P. Guo, S. Haitao, A. M. Hamilton, K. Hare, B. Hedges, N. Heideman, C. Hilton-Taylor, R. Hitchmough, B. Hollingsworth, M. Hutchinson, I. Ineich, J. Iverson, F. M. Jaksic, R. Jenkins, U. Joger, R. Jose, Y. Kaska, J. S. Keogh, G. Köhler, G. Kuchling, Y. Kumluta, A. Kwet, E. La Marca, W. Lamar, A. Lane, B. Lardner, C. Latta, G. Latta, M. Lau, P. Lavin, D. Lawson, M. LeBreton, E. Lehr, D. Limpus, N. Lipczynski, A. S. Lobo, M. A. López-Luna, L. Luiselli, V. Lukoschek, M. Lundberg, P. Lymberakis, R. Macey, W. E. Magnusson, L. Mahler, A. Malhotra, J. Mariaux, B. Maritz, O. A. V. Marques, R. Márquez, M. Martins, G. Masterson, J. A. Mateo, R. Mathew, N. Mathews, G. Mayer, J. R. McCranie, J. Measey, F. Mendoza-Quijano, M. Menegon, S. Métrailler, D. A. Milton, C. Montgomery, S. A. A. Morato, T. Mott, A. Muñoz-Alonso, J. Murphy, T. Q. Nguyen, G. Nilson, C. Nogueira, H. Núñez, H. Ota, J. Ottenwalder, T. Papenfuss, S. Pasachnik, P. Passos, O. S. G. Pauwels, V. Pérez Mellado, N. Pérez-Buitrago, E. R. Pianka, J. Pleguezuelos, C. Pollock, P. Ponce-Campos, R. Powell, F. Pupin, G. E. Quintero Díaz, R. Radder, J. Ramer, A. R. Rasmussen, C. Raxworthy, R. Reynolds, N. Richman, E. L. Rico, E. Riservato, G. Rivas, P. L. B. Rocha, M.-O. Rödel, L. Rodríguez Schettino, W. M. Roosenburg, J. P. Ross, R. Sadek, K. Sanders, G. Santos-Barrera, H. H. Schleich, B. Schmidt, A. Schmitz, M. Sharifi, G. Shea, R. Shine, T. Slimani, R. Somaweera, S. Spawls, P. Stafford, R. Stuebing, S. Sweet, E. Sy, H. Temple, M. Tognielli, K. Tolley, P. J. Tolson, B. Tuniyev, S. Tuniyev, N. Üzüm, G. van Buurt, M. Van Sluys, A. Velasco, M. Vences, M. Veselý, S. Vinke, T. Vinke, G. Vogel, M. Vogrin, R. C. Vogt, O. R. Wearn, Y. L. Werner, M. J. Whiting, T. Wiewandt, J. Wilkinson, B. Wilson, S. Wren, T. Zamin, K. Zhou, and G. Zug. 2013. The conservation status of the world’s reptiles. Biological Conservation 157: 372–385.
  7. Muñiz Pagan, D. N., M. E. Gifford, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2012. Ecological performance in the actively foraging lizard Ameiva ameiva (Teiidae). Journal of Herpetology 46: 253–256.
  8. Gifford, M. E., T. A. Clay, and R. Powell. 2012. Habitat use and activity influence thermoregulation in a tropical lizard Ameiva exsul. Journal of Thermal Biology 37: 496–501.
  9. Powell, R. 2012. Hispaniola and Navassa. In: R. Powell and R. W. Henderson (eds.), Island lists of West Indian amphibians and reptiles. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History 51: 131–137.
  10. Wilson, B. S., T. Edwards, and R. Powell. 2012. Jamaica. In: R. Powell and R. W. Henderson (eds.), Island lists of West Indian amphibians and reptiles. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History 51: 128–130.
  11. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2012. Swan Islands. In: R. Powell and R. W. Henderson (eds.), Island lists of West Indian amphibians and reptiles. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History 51: 93–94.
  12. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson (eds.). 2012. Island lists of West Indian amphibians and reptiles. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History 51: 87–168.
  13. Rivera Rodríguez, M. J., E. J. Bentz, D. P. Scantlebury, R. R. John, D. P. Quinn, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. Rediscovery of the Grenada Bank Endemic, Typhlops tasymicris (Squamata: Typhlopidae). Journal of Herpetology 45: 167–168.
  14. McTaggart, A. L., D. P. Quinn, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. A rapid assessment of reptilian diversity on Union Island, St. Vincent and the Grenadines. South American Journal of Herpetology 6: 59–65.
  15. Bentz, E. J., M. J. Rivera Rodríguez, R. R. John, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. Population densities, activity, microhabitats, and thermal biology of a unique crevice and litter-dwelling assemblage of reptiles on Union Island, St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 6: 40–50.
  16. Rivera Rodríguez, M. J., E. J. Bentz, R. R. John, and R. Powell. 2011. Intraspecific and intergeneric behavioral interactions of Sphaerodactylus kirbyi and Gonatodes daudini (Squamata: Sphaerodactylidae) on Union Island, St. Vincent and Grenadines. Salamandra 47: 9–16 (plus cover photograph).
  17. Turk, P. A., N. N. Wyszynski, R. Powell , and R. W. Henderson. 2010. Population densities and water-loss rates of Gymnophthalmus pleii, Gymnophthalmus underwoodi, and Sphaerodactylus fantasticus fuga on Dominica, West Indies. Salamandra 46: 125–130.
  18. Joyce, T., D. A. Eifler, and R. Powell. 2010. Variable habitat use influences the mating system of a Lesser Antillean anole. Amphibia-Reptilia 31: 395–401.
  19. Rudman, S. M., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2009. Ameiva fuscata on Dominica, Lesser Antilles: Natural history and interactions with Anolis oculatus. Herpetological Bulletin (109): 17–24 (plus cover photograph).
  20. Zero, V. H., D. A. Eifler, and R. Powell. 2009. Foraging behavior of the lizard Ameiva erythrocephala. Herpetozoa 22: 167–171.
  21. Meshaka, W. E., Jr., and R. Powell. 2009. Diets of the native Southern Toad (Anaxyrus terrestris) and the exotic Cane Toad (Rhinella marina) from a single site in south-central Florida. Florida Scientist 73: 173–177.
  22. Carter, R. E., C. S. Berg, J. W. Ackley, and R. Powell. 2009. Frogs of Dominica, with notes on habitat use by two species of Eleutherodactylus. Herpetological Bulletin (108): 14–23.
  23. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2009. The state of natural history: A perspective from the literature on West Indian herpetology. Herpetological Review 40: 273–275.
  24. Muelleman, P. J., L. A. White, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2009. Activity patterns of Alsophis sibonius and Liophis juliae (Dipsadidae) in Cabrits National Park, Dominica, West Indies. South American Journal of Herpetology 4: 55–60.
  25. Ackley, J. W., P. J. Muelleman, R. E. Carter, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2009. A rapid assessment of herpetofaunal diversity in variously altered habitats on Dominica. Applied Herpetology 6: 171–184.
  26. Powell, R., and S. J. Incháustegui. 2009. Conservation of the herpetofauna of the Dominican Republic. Applied Herpetology 6: 103–122.
  27. Brennan, A. M., E. J. Censky, and R. Powell. 2009. Effects of chigger mite (Acari: Trombiculidae) infections on Ameiva (Squamata: Teiidae) from the Anguilla Bank. Contemporary Herpetology 2009(1): 1–3.
  28. Marcum, M. A., M. A. Powell, A. J. Muensch, H. F. Arnold, and R. Powell. 2008. Social behaviour of the dwarf gecko Sphaerodactylus vincenti vincenti on St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles. Salamandra 44: 15–22.
  29. Treglia, M. L., A. J. Muensch, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2008. Invasive Anolis sagrei on St. Vincent and its potential impact on perch heights of Anolis trinitatis. Caribbean Journal of Science 44 : 251–256 .
  30. Hite, J. L., C. A. Rodríguez Gómez, S. C. Larimer, A. M. Díaz-Lameiro, and R. Powell. 2008. Anoles of St. Vincent (Squamata: Polychrotidae): Population densities and structural habitat use. Caribbean Journal of Science 44: 102–115.
  31. Mallery, C. S., Jr. , M. A. Marcum, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. W. Henderson. 2007. Herpetofaunal communities of the leeward slopes and coasts of St. Vincent: A comparison of sites variously altered by human activity. Applied Herpetology 4: 313–325.
  32. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2007. The St. Vincent (Lesser Antilles) herpetofauna: Conservation concerns. Applied Herpetology 4: 295–312.
  33. Gifford, M. E., and R. Powell. 2007. Sexual dimorphism and reproductive characteristics in five species of Leiocephalus lizards from the Dominican Republic. Journal of Herpetology 41: 521–527.
  34. Steinberg, D. S. , S. D. Powell , R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. W. Henderson. 2007. Population densities, water loss rates, and diets of Sphaerodactylus vincenti on St. Vincent, West Indies. Journal of Herpetology 41: 330–336.
  35. Díaz-Lameiro, A. M. , R. Powell, and C. S. Berg. 2007. Colour and pattern polymorphism in Eleutherodactylus shrevei and Eleutherodactylus johnstonei (Leptodactylidae) on St. Vincent, West Indies. Herpetological Bulletin (101): 18–25.
  36. Barun, A., G. Perry, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2007. Alsophis portoricensis anegadae (Squamata: Colubridae): Morphometric characteristics, activity patterns, and habitat use. Copeia 2007: 93–100.
  37. Larimer, S. C. , R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2006. Effects of structural habitat on the escape behavior of the lizard, Anolis gingivinus. Amphibia-Reptilia 27: 569–574.
  38. Powell, R. 2006. Conservation of the herpetofauna on the Dutch Windward Islands: St. Eustatius, Saba, and St. Maarten. Applied Herpetology 3: 293–306.
  39. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2005. A new species of Gonatodes (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from the West Indies. Caribbean Journal of Science 41: 709–715.
  40. Medina Díaz, P. , H. M. Heinz, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2005. Population densities and structural habitats of Anolis lizards on St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. Caribbean Journal of Science 41: 296–306.
  41. Kerr, A. M. , R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2005. Ameiva erythrocephala (Teiidae) on Sint Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles: Baseline data on a small population in a severely altered habitat. Caribbean Journal of Science 41:162–169.
  42. Simmons, P. M. , B. T. Greene, K. E. Williamson, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2005. Ecological interactions within a lizard community on Grenada. Herpetologica 61:124–134.
  43. Poche, A. J., Jr. , R. Powell, and R. W. Henderson. 2005. Sleep-site selection and fidelity in Grenadian anoles (Reptilia: Squamata: Polychrotidae). Schlafplatzwahl und -treue bei Echsen der Gattung Anolis aus Grenada (Reptilia: Squamata: Polychrotidae). Herpetozoa 18:3–10.
  44. Wissmann, S. M., R. L. Hensley, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2005. Social behaviour in the dwarf geckos Sphaerodactylus sabanus and S. sputator from St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. Salamandra 41: 45–50.
  45. Savit, A. Z. , A. J. Maley, H. M. Heinz, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2005. Distribution and activity periods of Alsophis rufiventris (Colubridae) on The Quill, St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. Amphibia-Reptilia 26: 418–421.
  46. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2005. Thomas Barbour and the Utowana voyages (1929–1934) in the West Indies. Bonner Zoologische Beiträge 52: 297–309.
  47. Heinz, H. M., A. J. Maley, A. Z. Savit, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2004. Behaviour and time allotment in the West Indian snake, Alsophis rufiventris (Colubridae). Herpetological Bulletin (89): 22–25.
  48. Hensley, R. L., S. M. Wissman, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2004. Habitat preferences and abundance of Dwarf Geckos (Sphaerodactylus) on St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. Caribbean Journal of Science 40: 427–429.
  49. Gifford, M. E., R. Powell, A. Larson, and R. L. Gutberlet, Jr. 2004. Population structure and history of a phenotypically variable teiid lizard (Ameiva chrysolaema) from Hispaniola: The influence of a geologically complex island. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 32: 735–748.
  50. Yorks, D. T., K. E. Williamson, R. W. Henderson, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2004. Foraging behavior in the arboreal boid Corallus grenadensis. Studies of the Neotropical Fauna and Environment 38: 167–172.
  51. Harris, B. R., D. T. Yorks, C. A. Bohnert, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2004. Population densities and structural habitats in lowland populations of Anolis lizards on Grenada. Caribbean Journal of Science 40: 31–40.
  52. Fontenot, B. E., M. E. Gifford, and R. Powell. 2003. Seasonal variation in dietary preferences of a Hispaniolan anole, Anolis longitibialis. Herpetological Bulletin (86): 2–4.
  53. Decker, H., R. Powell, and A. M. Bauer. 2003. Gecko populations on Coconut Island, Hawai'i. Gekkota 4: 25–33.
  54. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2003. A second set of addenda to the checklist of West Indian amphibians and reptiles. Herpetological Review 34: 341–345.
  55. Glor, R. E., J. J. Kolbe, R. Powell, A. Larson, and J. B. Losos. 2003. Phylogenetic analysis of ecological and morphological diversification in Hispaniolan trunk-ground anoles (Anolis cybotes group). Evolution 57: 2383–2397.
  56. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2003. Taxonomic and conservation status of giant Hispaniolan Celestus (Reptilia, Anguidae). Caribbean Journal of Science 39: 237–240.
  57. Sander, J. M., J. M. Germano, R. Powell, and R. W. Henderson. 2003. Colour and pattern polymorphism in Eleutherodactylus johnstonei on Grenada. Herpetological Bulletin (83): 22–25.
  58. Germano, J. M., J. M. Sander, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2003. Herpetofaunal communities in Grenada: A comparison of altered sites, with an annotated checklist of Grenadian amphibians and reptiles. Caribbean Journal of Science 39: 68–76.
  59. Williamson, K. E., A. J. Poche, Jr., B. T. Greene, B. R. Harris, J. M. Germano, P. M. Simmons, D. T. Yorks, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. W. Henderson. 2003 ("2002"). Herpetofauna of Hog Island, Grenada. Herpetological Bulletin (82): 26–29.
  60. Greene, B. T., D. T. Yorks, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. Powell, and R. W. Henderson. 2002. Discovery of Anolis sagrei in Grenada with comments on its potential impact on native anoles. Caribbean Journal of Science 38: 270–272.
  61. White, A. M., R. Powell, and E. J. Censky. 2002. On the thermal biology of Ameiva (Teiidae) from the Anguilla Bank, West Indies: Does melanism matter? Amphibia-Reptilia 23: 517–523.
  62. Gifford, M. E., Y. M. Ramos, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2002. Natural history of a saxicolous anole, Anolis longitibialis from Hispaniola. Herpetological Natural History 9: 15–20.
  63. Shew, J. J., S. C. Larimer, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2002. Sleeping patterns and sleep-site fidelity of Anolis gingivinus on Anguilla. Caribbean Journal of Science 38: 136–138.
  64. Eaton, J. M., S. C. Larimer, K. G. Howard, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2002. Population densities and ecological release of a solitary species: Anolis gingivinus on Anguilla, West Indies. Caribbean Journal of Science 38: 27–36.
  65. Nava, S. S., C. R. Lindsay, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2001. Microhabitat, activity, and density of a dwarf gecko (Sphaerodactylus parvus) on Anguilla, West Indies. Amphibia-Reptilia 22: 455–464.
  66. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2001. On the taxonomic status of some Lesser Antillean lizards. Caribbean Journal of Science 37: 288–290.
  67. Howard, K. G., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2001. Natural history of the edificarian geckos Hemidactylus mabouia, Thecadactylus rapicauda, and Sphaerodactylus sputator on Anguilla. Caribbean Journal of Science 37: 285–288.
  68. Sifers, S. M., M. L. Yeska, Y. M. Ramos, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2001. Anolis lizards restricted to altered edge habitats in a Hispaniolan cloud forest. Caribbean Journal of Science 37: 55–62.
  69. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2001. Responses by the West Indian herpetofauna to human-influenced resources. Caribbean Journal of Science 37: 41–54.
  70. Nelson, S. E., B. L. Banbury, R. A. Sosa, and R. Powell. 2001. Natural history of Leiocephalus semilineatus in association with sympatric Leiocephalus schreibersii and Ameiva lineolata. Contemporary Herpetology 2001(1): 1–6 + 4 figures + 2 tables (http://www.cnah.org/ch/ch/2001/1/index.htm).
  71. Birt, F. A., R. Powell, and B. D. Greene. 2001. Natural history of Anolis barkeri, a semi-aquatic lizard from southern México. Journal of Herpetology 35: 161–166.
  72. Townsend, J. H., J. M. Eaton, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. W. Henderson. 2000. Cuban treefrogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis) in Anguilla, Lesser Antilles. Caribbean Journal of Science 36: 326–328.
  73. Gifford, M. E., R. Powell, and W. E. Steiner, Jr. 2000. Relationship of diet and prey availability in Aristelliger cochranae, a gecko from Navassa Island, West Indies. Caribbean Journal of Science 36: 323–326.
  74. Schneider, K. R., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. Escape behavior of Anolis lizards from the Sierra de Baoruco, Dominican Republic. Caribbean Journal of Science 36: 321–323.
  75. Cast, E. E., M. E. Gifford, K. R. Schneider, A. J. Hardwick, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2000. Natural history of an anoline lizard community in the Sierra de Baoruco, República Dominicana. Caribbean Journal of Science 36: 258–266.
  76. Hartley, L. M., R. E. Glor, A. L. Sproston, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. Germination rates of seeds consumed by two species of Rock Iguanas (Cyclura spp.) in the Dominican Republic. Caribbean Journal of Science 36: 149–151.
  77. Powell, R., J. A. Ottenwalder, S. J. Incháustegui, R. W. Henderson, and R. E. Glor. 2000. Amphibians and reptiles of the Dominican Republic: Species of special concern. Oryx 34: 118–128.
  78. Yeska, M. L., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. The lizards of Cayo Pisaje, Dominican Republic, Hispaniola. Herpetological Review 31: 18–20.
  79. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 1999. Addenda to the checklist of West Indian amphibians and reptiles. Herpetological Review 30: 137–139.
  80. Howard, A. K., J. D. Forester, J. M. Ruder, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1999. Natural history of a terrestrial Hispaniolan anole: Anolis barbouri. Journal of Herpetology 33: 702–706.
  81. Powell, R. 1999. Herpetology of Navassa Island, West Indies. Caribbean Journal of Science 35: 1–13.
  82. Sproston, A. L., R. E. Glor, L. M. Hartley, E. J. Censky, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1999. Niche differences among three sympatric species of Ameiva (Reptilia: Teiidae) on Hispaniola. Journal of Herpetology 33: 131–136.
  83. Powell, R., J. H. Greve, and A. K. Howard. 1998. Hispaniolan Eleutherodactylus (Anura: Leptodactylidae) as hosts of immature Terranova (Nematoda: Ascarididae), with notes on additional nematodes. Caribbean Journal of Science 34: 155–157.
  84. Micco, S. M., G. J. Lahey, R. A. Sosa, R. Powell, E. J. Censky, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1997 (1998). Natural history of Leiocephalus barahonensis (Tropiduridae) on the Península de Barahona, Hispaniola: An examination of two populations. Herpetological Natural History 5: 147–156.
  85. Howard, A. K., J. D. Forester, J. M. Ruder, and R. Powell. 1997. Diets of two syntopic frogs: Eleutherodactylus abbotti and E. armstrongi (Leptodactylidae) from the Sierra de Baoruco, Hispaniola. Herpetological Natural History 5(1): 77–82.
  86. Lenart, L. A., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D. D. Smith. 1997. Anoline diversity in three differentially altered habitats in the Sierra de Baoruco, República Dominicana, Hispaniola. Biotropica 29: 117–123.
  87. Huntington, C., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., G. L. Cisper, D. D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1997. Two new Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina) from Ameiva spp. (Lacertilia: Teiidae) in the Dominican Republic. Revista Brasileira de Biologia 57: 11–14.
  88. Huntington, C., G. Cisper, D. D. Smith, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and A. Lathrop. 1996. Two new Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Amphisbaena manni (Amphisbaenia: Amphisbaenidae) in the Dominican Republic. Caribbean Journal of Science 32: 50–53.
  89. Zippel, K. C., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., S. Monks, A. Lathrop, and D. D. Smith. 1996. The distribution of larval Eutrombicula alfreddugesi (Acari: Trombiculidae) infesting Anolis lizards (Lacertilia: Polychrotidae) from different habitats on Hispaniola. Caribbean Journal of Science 32: 43–49.
  90. Queral, A., R. Garcia, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., D. D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1995. Agonistic responses by a grass anole, Anolis olssoni from the Dominican Republic, to male conspecifics. Amphibia-Reptilia 16: 313–321.
  91. Cisper, G. L., C. Huntington, D. D. Smith, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and A. Lathrop. 1995. Four new Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from anoles (Lacertilia: Polychrotidae) in the Dominican Republic. Journal of Parasitology 81: 252–255.
  92. Lenart, L. A., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., D. D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1994 (1995). The diet and a gastric parasite of Anolis armouri, a cybotoid anole from montane pine forests in southern Hispaniola. Herpetological Natural History 2(2): 97–100.
  93. Allen, A. L., M. K. Albright, and R. Powell. 1994 (1995). Notes on the reproductive biology of Anolis barahonae (Lacertilia: Polychrotidae), a crown-dwelling giant anole from Hispaniola. Herpetological Natural History 2(2): 93–95.
  94. Garcia, R., A. Queral, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., D. D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1994. Evidence of hybridization among green anoles (Lacertilia: Polychrotidae) from Hispaniola. Caribbean Journal of Science 30: 279–281.
  95. Bowersox, S. R., S. Calderón, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., D. D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1994. Nahrung eines Riesenanolis, Anolis barahonae, von Hispaniola, mit einer Zusammenfassung des Nahrungsspektrums westindischer Riesenanolis-Arten. Salamandra 30: 155–160.
  96. Smith, D. D., P. T. Schell, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1994. Pharyngeal myiasis by sarcophagid larvae (Diptera) in Ameiva chrysolaema (Sauria: Teiidae) from the Dominican Republic. Caribbean Journal of Science 30: 148–149.
  97. Zani, P. A., S. I. Guttman, and R. Powell. 1993. The genetic relations of Anolis cristatellus (Sauria: Polychridae) from Hispaniola and Puerto Rico. Caribbean Journal of Science 29: 250–253.
  98. Cunningham, C. A., J. S. Tulloch, and R. Powell. 1993. Food habits of four Hispaniolan species of Sphaerodactylus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae). Herpetological Natural History 1(2): 91–93.
  99. Powell, R. 1993. Comments on the taxonomic arrangement of some Hispaniolan amphibians and reptiles. Herpetological Review 24: 135–137.
  100. Smith, D. D., D. J. Pflanz, and R. Powell. 1993. Observations of autohemorrhaging in Tropidophis haetianus, Rhinocheilus lecontei, Heterodon platyrhinos, and Nerodia erythrogaster. Herpetological Review 24: 130–131.
  101. Schell, P. T., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D. D. Smith. 1993. Natural history of Ameiva chrysolaema (Sauria: Teiidae) from Barahona, Dominican Republic. Copeia 1993: 859–862.
  102. Schreiber, M. C., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D. D. Smith. 1993. Natural history of a small population of Leiocephalus schreibersii (Sauria: Tropiduridae) from altered habitat in the Dominican Republic. Florida Scientist 56: 18–27.
  103. White, L. R., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D. D. Smith. 1992. Food habits of three syntopic reptiles from the Barahona Peninsula, Hispaniola. Journal of Herpetology 26: 518–520.
  104. Bui, H. T., R. Powell, D. D. Smith, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and A. Lathrop. 1992. A new coccidian parasite (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina) from Anolis distichus (Sauria: Polychridae) in the Dominican Republic. Journal of Parasitology 78: 784–785.
  105. Powell, R., R. J. Passaro, and R. W. Henderson. 1992. Noteworthy herpetological records from Saint [sic] Maarten, Netherlands Antilles. Caribbean Journal of Science 28: 234–235.
  106. Duer, C. K., J. M. Cisek, and R. Powell. 1992. Food habits of Osteopilus dominicensis (Tschudi, 1838) (Anura: Hylidae). Caribbean Journal of Science 28: 226–228.
  107. Fobes, T. M., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D. D. Smith. 1992. Natural history of Anolis cybotes (Sauria: Polychridae) in a disturbed habitat in Barahona, Dominican Republic. Caribbean Journal of Science 28: 200–207.
  108. Bui, H. T., D. D. Smith, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and A. Lathrop. 1992. A redescription of Eimeria helenlevineae (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Hemidactylus brooki haitianus (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Hispaniola. Caribbean Journal of Science 28: 109–110.
  109. Pflanz, D. J., M. A. Cusumano, and R. Powell. 1991. Notes on reproduction in a xeric-adapted anole, Anolis whitemani (Sauria: Polychridae) from Hispaniola. Journal of Herpetology 25: 491–493.
  110. Riley, J., R. Powell, and D. D. Smith. 1991. Further observations of blunt-hooked pentastomids belonging to the Genus Raillietiella Sambon, 1910 infecting Hemidactylus brookii (Sauria: Gekkonidae) in Africa and the Caribbean: Comparison with closely related Raillietiella spp. from an African skink (Mabuya perrotetii). Systematic Parasitology 20: 47–57.
  111. Cusumano, M. A., and R. Powell. 1991. A note on the diet of Amphisbaena gonavensis in the Dominican Republic. Amphibia-Reptilia 12: 350–352.
  112. Powell, R., S. A. Maxey, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and D. D. Smith. 1991. Notes on the reproductive biology of a montane population of Antillophis parvifrons protenus (Serpentes: Colubridae) from the Dominican Republic. Journal of Herpetology 25: 121–122.
  113. Powell, R., M. W. Inboden, and D. D. Smith. 1990. Erstnachweis von Hybriden zwischen den Klapperschlangen Crotalus cerastes laterorepens Klauber, 1944 and Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus (Kennicott, 1861). Salamandra 26: 319–320.
  114. Powell, R., D. D. Smith, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., C. V. Taylor, Jr., and M. L. Jolley. 1990. Range expansion by an introduced anole: Anolis porcatus in the Dominican Republic. Amphibia-Reptilia 11: 421–425.
  115. Powell, R., S. A. Maxey, and J. H. Greve. 1990. The occurrence of Terranova caballeroi (Nematoda: Ascarididae) in Antillophis parvifrons protenus (Serpentes: Colubridae) from Hispaniola. Caribbean Journal of Science 26: 72.
  116. Powell, R., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., M. A. Rice, and D. D. Smith. 1990. Ecological observations of Hemidactylus brookii haitianus Meerwarth (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Hispaniola. Caribbean Journal of Science 26: 67–70.
  117. Powell, R., P. J. Hall, J. H. Greve, and D. D. Smith. 1990. Occurrence of Trichospirura teixeirai (Spirurida: Rhabdochonidae) in Hemidactylus brookii haitianus (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Hispaniola. Journal of the Helminthological Society of Washington 57: 74–75.
  118. Powell, R., P. J. Hall, and J. H. Greve. 1990. Occurrence of Skrjabinoptera leiocephalorum (Spirurida: Physalopteridae) in Leiocephalus spp. (Sauria: Iguanidae) from Hispaniola. Journal of the Helminthological Society of Washington 57: 75–77.
  119. Greve, J. H. and R. Powell. 1989. Skrjabinoptera leiocephalorum sp.n. (Nematoda: Physalopteroidea) in Leiocephalus spp. (Reptilia: Iguanidae) from Hispaniola. Journal of Parasitology 75: 677–679.
  120. White, B. U., E. van der Horst, and R. Powell. 1986. Cytological differentiation of gray treefrogs from Missouri. Transactions of the Missouri Academy of Science 20: 23–24.
  121. Powell, R., L. W. Litle, and D. D. Smith. 1984. Eine Wohngemeinschaft von Physalaemus pustulosus (Cope, 1864) (Salientia: Leptodactylidae) mit einer bodenwohnende Vogelspinne. Salamandra 20: 273–274.
  122. Powell, R., N. A. Laposha, D. D. Smith, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1984. New distributional records for some semiaquatic amphibians and reptiles from the Rio Sabinas Basin, Coahuila, Mexico. Herpetological Review 15: 78–79.
  123. Smith, D. D., R. Powell, T. R. Johnson, and H. L. Gregory. 1983. Life history observations of Missouri amphibians and reptiles with recommendations for standardized data collection. Transactions of the Missouri Academy of Science 17: 37–58.
  124. Powell, R., K. P. Bromeier, N. A. Laposha, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and B. Miller. 1982. Maximum sizes of amphibians and reptiles from Missouri. Transactions of the Missouri Academy of Science 16: 99–106.
  125. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1981. Eine bisher unbeschreibte Farbenvariation bei Lampropeltis triangulum blanchardi. Salamandra 17: 83–86.

CATALOGUE OF AMERICAN AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES: ACCOUNTS

  1. Powell, R. 2014. Cubophis vudii. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (903): 1–15.
  2. Les, A. M., and R. Powell. 2014. Anolis smaragdinus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (902): 1–15.
  3. Powell, R., and A. M. Bauer. 2012. Sphaerodactylus sputator. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (897): 1–7.
  4. John, R. R., M. J. Rivera Rodríguez, E. J. Bentz, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2012. Gonatodes daudini. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (895): 1–2.
  5. John, R. R., E. J. Bentz, M. J. Rivera Rodríguez, A. M. Bauer, and R. Powell. 2012. Bachia heteropa. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (894): 1–9.
  6. Powell, R., and A. M. Bauer. 2012. Anolis gingivinus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (893): 1–8.
  7. John, R. R., H. D. Hedman, and R. Powell. 2012. Anolis aeneus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (892): 1–11.
  8. Rudman, S. M., and R. Powell. 2009. Typhlops dominicanus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (879): 1–3.
  9. Powell, R., R. W. Henderson, and R. S. Thorpe. 2009. Sphaerodactylus phyzacinus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (876): 1–3.
  10. Daniells, E. A., N. J. Vélez Espinet, R. S. Thorpe, and R. Powell. 2009. Sphaerodactylus fantasticus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (875): 1–8.
  11. Powell, R., and M. E. Gifford. 2009. Leiocephalus lunatus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (874): 1–5.
  12. Carter, R. E., H. Kaiser, and R. Powell. 2009. Eleutherodactylus amplinympha. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (864): 1–4.
  13. Steinberg, D. S., J. L. Hite, R. Powell, and R. W. Henderson. 2008. Sphaerodactylus vincenti. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (853): 1–6.
  14. Hite, J. L., D. S. Steinberg, and R. Powell. 2008. Sphaerodactylus kirbyi. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (852): 1–2.
  15. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2008. Sphaerodactylus cochranae. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (851): 1–2.
  16. Díaz-Lameiro, A. M., H. Kaiser, and R. Powell. 2008. Pristimantis shrevei. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (844): 1–4.
  17. Maley, A. J., A. Z. Savit, H. M. Heinz, R. Powell, and R. W. Henderson. 2006. Alsophis rufiventrisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (818): 1–4.
  18. Kerr, A. M., V. H. Zero, and R. Powell. 2006. Ameiva erythrocephalaCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (817): 1–4.
  19. Hensley, R. L., A. Z. Savit, and R. Powell. 2006. Anolis schwartziCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (816): 1–5.
  20. Powell, M. A., R. Powell, and R. W. Henderson. 2006. Anolis sabanusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (815): 1–5.
  21. Pasachnik, S. A., M. Breuil, and R. Powell. 2006. Iguana delicatissimaCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (811): 1–14.
  22. Hensley, R. L., and R. Powell. 2006. Sphaerodactylus sabanusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (809): 1–3.
  23. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2004. Epicrates fordiiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (800): 1–3.
  24. Williamson, K. E., and R. Powell. 2004. Gymnophthalmus underwoodiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (793): 1–5.
  25. Yorks, D. T., R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2003. Typhlops tasymicrisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (780): 1–2.
  26. Greene, B. T., R. Powell, and R. W. Henderson. 2003. Mastigodryas bruesiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (777): 1–3.
  27. Sander, J. M., H. Kaiser, and R. Powell. 2003. Eleutherodactylus euphronidesCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (764): 1–3.
  28. Powell, R. 2002. Tropidophis bucculentusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (760): 1–3.
  29. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2002. Epicrates gracilisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (754): 1–4.
  30. Nava, S. S., C. R. Lindsay, and R. Powell. 2002. Sphaerodactylus parvusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (752): 1–2.
  31. Nelson, S. E., and R. Powell. 2002. Leiocephalus semilineatusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (751): 1–2.
  32. Gifford, M. E., and R. Powell. 2002. Anolis sheplaniCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (750): 1–2.
  33. Gifford, M. E., and R. Powell. 2002. Anolis longitibialisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (749): 1–4.
  34. Powell, R. 2002. Anolis alinigerCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (748): 1–3.
  35. Shew, J. J., E. J. Censky, and R. Powell. 2002. Ameiva corvinaCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (747): 1–2.
  36. White, A. M., E. J. Censky, and R. Powell. 2002. Ameiva coraxCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (746): 1–2.
  37. Ramos, Y. M., and R. Powell. 2001. Anolis coelestinusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (729): 1–5.
  38. Ramos, Y. M., and R. Powell. 2001. Anolis chlorocyanusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (728): 1–6.
  39. Powell, R., and R. A. Birt. 2001. Anolis barkeriCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (727): 1–3.
  40. Townsend, J. H., R. Powell, and R. W. Henderson. 2000. Alsophis rijgersmaeiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (717): 1–3.
  41. Powell, R., and R.E. Glor. 2000. Cyclura stejnegeriCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (711): 1–4.
  42. Powell, R. 2000. Cyclura onchiopsisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (710): 1–3.
  43. Glor, R. E., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. Cyclura cornutaCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (709): 1–6.
  44. Powell, R. 1999. Sphaerodactylus beckiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (697): 1–2.
  45. Powell, R. 1999. Leiocephalus eremitusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (696): 1–2.
  46. Powell, R. 1999. Leiocephalus barahonensisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (695): 1–4.
  47. Powell, R. 1999. Celestus badiusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (694): 1–2.
  48. Powell, R. 1999. Anolis longicepsCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (693): 1–2.
  49. Howard, A. K., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1999. Anolis barbouriCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (692): 1–4.
  50. Greene, B. D., R.F. Wilkinson, and R. Powell. 1998. Micrurus limbatusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (678): 1–3.
  51. Powell, R., and R. D. Wittenberg. 1998. Bothrops caribbaeusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (676): 1–4.
  52. Powell, R., R. I. Crombie, and H. E. A. Boos. 1998. Hemidactylus mabouiaCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (674): 1–11.
  53. Powell, R., and J. A. Neland. 1998. Anolis eugenegrahamiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (672): 1–2.
  54. Sproston, A. L., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee. 1998. Ameiva leberiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (670): 1–2.
  55. Hedges, S. B., and R. Powell. 1998. Eleutherodactylus thorectesCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (667): 1–2.
  56. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 1998. Alsophis melanichnusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (660): 1–2.
  57. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 1998. Alsophis anomalusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (559): 1–2.
  58. Glor, R. E., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee. 1998. Cyclura ricordiiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (657): 1–3.
  59. Hartley, L. M., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee. 1998. Ameiva lineolataCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (654): 1–4.
  60. Hedges, S. B., and R. Powell. 1998. Eleutherodactylus parapelatesCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (649): 1–2.
  61. Cunningham, C. A., R. Powell, and S. B. Hedges. 1998. Eleutherodactylus chlorophenaxCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (648): 1–2.
  62. Hedges, S. B., and R. Powell. 1998. Eleutherodactylus amadeusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (647): 1–2.
  63. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 1996. Chironius vincentiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (635): 1–2.
  64. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 1996. Alsophis sanctaecrucisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (634): 1–2.
  65. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 1996. Alsophis aterCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (633): 1–2.
  66. Henderson, R. W., R. Powell, J. Daltry, and M. L. Day. 1996. Alsophis antiguaeCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (632): 1–3.
  67. White, L. R., and R. Powell. 1996. Celestus agasepsoidesCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (627): 1–2.
  68. Thomas, R., and R. Powell. 1995. Typhlops titanopsCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (620): 1–2.
  69. Thomas, R., and R. Powell. 1995. Typhlops gonavensisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (619): 1–2.
  70. Thomas, R., and R. Powell. 1995. Typhlops capitulatusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (618): 1–2.
  71. Sosa, R. A., R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 1995. Hypsirhynchus, H. feroxCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (617): 1–4.
  72. Schreiber, M. C., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1995. Leiocephalus schreibersiiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (613): 1–4.
  73. Smith, J. W., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis olssoniCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (611): 1–5.
  74. Moster, J. A., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis brevirostrisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (610): 1–4.
  75. Calderón, S., S. R. Bowersox, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis barahonaeCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (609): 1–3.
  76. Sowell, S. P., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis bahorucoensisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (608): 1–3.
  77. Lenart, L. A., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis armouriCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (607): 1–3.
  78. Ruder, J. M., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1995. Eleutherodactylus rufifemoralisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (601): 1–2.
  79. Powell, R., J. T. Collins, and L. D. Fish. 1994. Virginia striatulaCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (599): 1–6.
  80. Thomas, R., and R. Powell. 1994. Typhlops tetrathyreusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (598): 1–2.
  81. Thomas, R., and R. Powell. 1994. Typhlops schwartziCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (597): 1–2.
  82. Thomas, R., and R. Powell. 1994. Typhlops sulcatusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (596): 1–2.
  83. Thomas, R., and R. Powell. 1994. Typhlops pusillusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (595): 1–2.
  84. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 1994. Ialtris parishiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (593): 1–2.
  85. Zippel, K. C., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1994. Ialtris dorsalisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (592): 1–3.
  86. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 1994. Ialtris agyrtesCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (591): 1–2.
  87. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 1994. IaltrisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (590): 1–2.
  88. Fobes, T. M., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1993. Anolis cybotesCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (564): 1–5.
  89. Schell, P. T., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1993. Ameiva chrysolaemaCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (563): 1–6.
  90. Powell, R., J. T. Collins, and L. D. Fish. 1992. Virginia valeriaeCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (552): 1–7.
  91. White, L. R., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1992. Typhlops syntherusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (551): 1–2.
  92. Thomas, R., and R. Powell. 1992. Typhlops hectusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (550): 1–2.
  93. Powell, R. 1992. Anolis porcatusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (541): 1–5.
  94. Powell, R. 1992. Amphisbaena gonavensisCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (539): 1–3.
  95. Powell, R. 1992. Peltophryne guentheriCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (535): 1–4.
  96. Powell, R., and G. K. Pregill. 1991. Peltophryne fluviaticaCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (507): 1–2.
  97. Powell, R. 1990. Elaphe vulpinaCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (470): 1–3.
  98. Powell, R., and S. A. Maxey. 1990. Hemidactylus brookiiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (493): 1–3.
  99. Powell, R. 1990. Hemidactylus palaichthusCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (468): 1.
  100. Powell, R. and D. K. Carr. 1990. Anolis whitemaniCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (462): 1–2.
  101. Rossman, D. A., and R. Powell. 1985. Clonophis, C. kirtlandiiCatalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (364): 1–2.

INDICES AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES

  1. Powell, R. (comp.). 2004. Indices to the Iguana Times (1990–2002) and Iguana (2003): Volumes 1–10. Iguana 11: 64–71.
  2. Powell, R., and R. E. Daniel (eds.). 2000. Additions to the bibliography of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (13): 22–23.
  3. Powell, R. (ed.). 1999. Additions to the bibliography of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (12): 22.
  4. Powell, R. (ed.). 1998. Additions to the bibliography of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (11): 19–20.
  5. Powell, R. (ed.). 1998. Recent literature on geckos. Dactylus 3: 85–86.
  6. Powell, R. (ed.). 1997. Additions to the bibliography of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (10): 72.
  7. Powell, R. (ed.). 1996. Additions to the bibliography of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (9): 19.
  8. Powell, R. (ed.). 1996. Recent literature on geckos. Dactylus 3:40–42.
  9. Powell, R. (ed.). 1995. Additions to the bibliography of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (8): 16.
  10. Powell, R. (ed.). 1994. Additions to the bibliography of references to the herpetofauna of Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (7): 10.
  11. Powell, R. (ed.). 1994. Index. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (Accounts 401–600): i + 32 p.
  12. Powell, R. (ed.). 1993. Additions to the bibliography of references to the herpetofauna of Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (6): 31.
  13. Powell, R. (ed.). 1992. Additions to the bibliography of references to the herpetofauna of Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (5): 15.
  14. Powell, R. (ed.). 1991. Additions to the bibliography of references to the herpetofauna of Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (4): 12–13.
  15. Powell, R. (ed.). 1990. Bibliography of references to the herpetofauna of Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (3): 13–17.
  16. Powell, R. (ed.). 1988. Index. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (Accounts 1–400): 1–61.

REVIEWS

  1. Powell, R. 2015. A new volume in the series on amphibian biology. [Review of:] Harold Heatwole and John W. Wilkinson (eds.), Amphibian Biology. Volume 11. Status of the Conservation and Decline of Amphibians: Eastern Hemisphere. Part 3. Southern Europe and Turkey. Reptiles & Amphibians 22: 93–94.
  2. Powell, R. 2014. Conservation for young readers. [Review of:] Sean Foley, The Iguana’s Eyes and Wendy Townsend, Blue Iguana. Reptiles & Amphibians 21: 144–145.
  3. Powell, R. 2013. [Review of:] C. Kenneth Dodd, Jr., Frogs of the United States and Canada. Reptiles & Amphibians 20: 158–159.
  4. Powell, R. 2013. Two new books about European amphibians and reptiles. [Review of:] Trevor J. C. Beebee, Reptiles and Amphibians. Naturalists’ Handbook 31. Ecology and Identification and Harold Heatwole and John W. Wilkinson (eds.), Amphibian Biology. Volume 11. Status of the Conservation and Decline of Amphibians: Eastern Hemisphere. Part 3. Western Europe. Reptiles & Amphibians 20: 155–157.
  5. Powell, R. 2013. [Review of:] Bo Beolens, Michael Watkins, and Michael Grayson, The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles and The Eponym Dictionary of Amphibians. Reptiles & Amphibians 20: 95–96.
  6. Powell, R. 2012. [Review of:] Marty Crump, Amphibians and Reptiles: An Introduction to Their Natural History and Conservation. Reptiles & Amphibians 19: 55–56.
  7. Powell, R. 2009. [Review of:] Fred Kraus, Alien Reptiles and Amphibians. Reptiles & Amphibians 16: 195–196.
  8. Powell, R. 2009. [Review of:] Lang Elliott, Carl Gerhardt, and Carlos Davidson, The Frogs and Toads of North America: A Comprehensive Guide to their Identification, Behavior, and Calls. Reptiles & Amphibians 16: 117.
  9. Powell, R. 2009. [Review of:] Kate Jackson, Mean and Lowly Things: Snakes, Science, and Survival in the Congo. Reptiles & Amphibians 16: 116.
  10. Powell, R. 2008. [Review of:] S. N. Stuart, M. Hoffmann, J. S. Chanson, N. A. Cox, R. Berridge, P. Ramani, and B. E. Young (eds.), Threatened Amphibians of the World. Iguana 15: 243–244.
  11. Powell, R. 2007. [Review of:] E. Fernández, Hispaniola. A Photographic Journey through Island Biodiversity. Bioversidad a Través de un Recorrido Fotográfico. Iguana 14: 260.
  12. Powell, R. 2007. [Review of:] F. Burton (illustrated by Penny Clifford), Wild Trees in the Cayman Islands. 2nd ed. Iguana 14: 194–195.
  13. Powell, R. 2006. [Review of:] M. A. Donnelly, B. I. Crother, C. Guyer, M. H. Wake, and M. E. White (eds.), Ecology & Evolution in the Tropics: A Herpetological Perspective. Iguana 13: 68–69.
  14. Powell, R. 2005. [Review of:] Gary P. Nabhan, Singing the Turtles to Sea: The Comcáac (Seri) Art and Science of Reptiles. Iguana 12: 50–55.
  15. Powell, R. 2004. Cuban herpetology. [Review of:] T. Barbour and C. T. Ramsden, The Herpetology of Cuba (facsimile reprint of the original 1919 edition, with an introduction by R. Ruibal); L. Rodríguez Schettino (ed.), The Iguanid Lizards of Cuba; L. Rodríguez Schettino (ed.), Anfibios y Reptiles de Cuba. Iguana (Journal of the International Iguana Society) 11: 126–128.
  16. Powell, R. 2003. [Review of:] David Badger, Lizards: A Natural History of some Uncommon Creatures – Extraordinary Chameleons, Iguanas, Geckos, & More. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 38: 204–205.
  17. Powell, R. 2003. [Review of:] R. L. Gray, Desert Lizards: Captive Husbandry and Propagation. Quarterly Review of Biology 78: 364.
  18. Powell, R. 2002. [Review of:] David Quammen, The Flight of the Iguana: A Sidelong View of Science and Nature. Iguana Times (Journal of the International Iguana Society) 9: 93.
  19. Powell, R. 2002. [Review of:] C. A. Woods and F. E. Sergile (eds.), Biogeography of the West Indies: Patterns and Perspectives. 2nd ed. Quarterly Review of Biology 77: 352–353.
  20. Powell, R. 2000. [Review of:] S. L. Lyons, Relevance revisited. Thomas Henry Huxley. The Evolution of a Scientist. Ecology 81: 2055–2056.
  21. Powell, R. 2000. [Review of:] L. Rodríguez Schettino (ed.), The Iguanid Lizards of Cuba. Caribbean Journal of Science 36: 171–173.
  22. Powell, R. 1999. [Review of:] Roger Conant and Joseph T. Collins, A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed., expanded. Herpetological Review 30: 59.
  23. Powell, R. 1993. [Review of:] F.-W. Henkel and W. Schmidt, Geckos: Biologie, Haltung und Zucht. Dactylus 2: 1–4.
  24. Powell, R. 1984. [Review of:] J. Villa, Nicaraguan fishes, amphibians, and reptiles. Copeia 1984: 276.
  25. Powell, R., and J. D. Villa. 1983. [Review of:] Missouri Department of Conservation, Missouri's venomous snakes. Herpetological Review 14: 91–92.
  26. Villa, J. D., and R. Powell. 1980. [Review of:] Missouri Department of Conservation, Voices of Missouri's Frogs and Toads. Copeia 1980: 189–190.

OBITUARIES

  1. Pisani, G. R., and R. Powell. 2012. Joseph T. Collins 1939–2012. Obituary. Copeia 2012: 351–354 (reprinted in Reptiles & Amphibians 19: 138–141).
  2. Powell, R. 2002. Dean E. Metter. Obituary. Herpetological Review 33: 83–85.

MISCELLANEOUS NOTES AND NON-REFEREED PUBLICATIONS

  1. Street, K. B., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2013. Adventitious scavenging by Cuban Treefrog tadpoles, Osteopilus septentrionalis (Anura: Hylidae). Herpetology Notes 6: 33–34.
  2. Powell, R. 2012. Geographic distribution: Apalone ferox. Herpetological Review 43: 302.
  3. Powell, M. A., and R. Powell. 2011. Aquatic turtles feasting on Periodical Cicadas. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter 24: 21.
  4. Quinn, D. P., A. L. McTaggart, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. Corallus grenadensis (Grenada Bank Treeboa, Congo Snake). Habitat and abundance. Herpetological Review 42: 438.
  5. Rivera Rodríguez, M. J., E. J. Bentz, R. R. John, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. Mastigodryas bruesi (Windward Tree Racer, White Snake). Miscellaneous behaviors. Herpetological Review 42: 293–294.
  6. John, R. R., E. J. Bentz, M. J. Rivera Rodríguez, M. E. Gifford, and R. Powell. 2011. Bachia heteropa alleni (Earless Worm Lizard). Escape and digging behaviors. Herpetological Review 42: 92.
  7. Hedman, H. D., D. N. Muñiz Pagan, and R. Powell. 2010. Chelonoidis carbonaria (Red-footed Tortoise). Size and thermal biology. Herpetological Review 41: 484–485.
  8. Leininger, P. D., R. Powell, and M. E. Gifford. 2010. Hanging on for dear life: A study of Anolis claws in arboreal and aquatic species. The Anolis Newsletter VI: 104–107.
  9. Turk, P. A., N. N. Wyszynski, and R. Powell. 2010. Iguana delicatissima (Lesser Antillean Iguana). Display behavior. Herpetological Review 41: 79–80.
  10. Barker, B. S., R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. Geographic distribution: Epicrates monensis granti. Herpetological Review 40: 455–456.
  11. Rudman, S. M., R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2009. Ameiva fuscata (Dominican Ground Lizard). Arboreal activity and diet. Herpetological Review 40: 219.
  12. Perry, G., and R. Powell. 2009. The herpetofauna of Guana Island: An annotated checklist and travelogue. Reptiles & Amphibians 16: 6–17.
  13. Perry, G., and R. Powell. 2008. Alsophis portoricensis anegadae (Racer). Cannibalism. Herpetological Review 39: 465.
  14. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2008. Exploitation of the night-light niche by a Dominican Racer. Iguana 15: 156–157.
  15. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2008. Avian predators of West Indian reptiles. Iguana 15: 8–11.
  16. Thomas, R., R. W. Henderson, R. Powell, and P. Genaro Rodríguez. 2007. Alsophis anomalus (Hispaniolan Brown Racer). Maximum size. Herpetological Review 38: 338–339.
  17. Powell, R. 2007. Commentary: Collecting animals from nature. Iguana 14: 47–51.
  18. Powell, R. 2007. Geographic distribution: Osteopilus septentrionalis. Herpetological Review 38: 215.
  19. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2006. Geographic distribution: Tantilla melanocephala. Herpetological Review 37: 501.
  20. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. Geographic distribution: Sphaerodactylus kirbyi. Herpetological Review 37: 495–496.
  21. van Buel, H., and R. Powell. 2006. Geographic distribution: Gymnophthalmus underwoodi. Herpetological Review 37: 494.
  22. Perry, G., R. Powell, and H. Watson. 2006. Keeping invasive species off Guana Island, British Virgin Islands. Iguana 13: 272–277.
  23. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2006. Geographic distribution: Bachia heteropa alleni. Herpetological Review 37: 360.
  24. Powell, R., G. Perry, R. W. Henderson, and A. Barun. 2006. Alsophis portoricensis anegadae. Aquatic activity. Herpetological Review 37: 228–229.
  25. Powell, R. 2006. Lizard warfare. Iguana 13: 22–23.
  26. Henderson, R. W., and R. Powell. 2005. Geographic distribution: Anolis sagrei. Herpetological Review 36: 467.
  27. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2005. Species profile: Hispaniolan vinesnakes. Iguana 12: 262.
  28. Powell, R. 2005. Species profile: Blunt-headed Tree Snake Imantodes cenchoa. Iguana 12: 122.
  29. Powell, R. 2005. 25 years of change. Iguana 12: 118–119.
  30. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 2005. Conservation status of Lesser Antillean reptiles. Iguana 12: 62–77.
  31. Pansza J. M., and R. Powell. 2005. Geographic distribution: Anolis carolinensis. Herpetological Review 36: 201.
  32. Powell, R., and J. M. Pansza. 2005. Geographic distribution: Anolis sagrei. Herpetological Review 36: 201.
  33. Heinz, H. M., A. Z. Savit, A. J. Maley, R. W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2005. Alsophis rufiventris. Foraging and diet. Herpetological Review 36: 186–187.
  34. Powell, R. 2004. Conservation of iguanas (Iguana delicatissima and I. iguana) in the Lesser Antilles. Iguana 11: 238–246.
  35. Powell, R. 2004. Species profile: Saw-scaled Curlytail: Leiocephalus carinatus. Iguana 11: 153.
  36. Fogarty, S. P., V. H. Zero, and R. Powell. 2004. Revisiting St. Eustatius: Estimating the population size of Lesser Antillean Iguanas (Iguana delicatissima). Iguana 11: 138–146.
  37. Powell, R. (not credited). 2004. Biographical sketch: Johann Baptist von Spix. Iguana 11: 125.
  38. Powell, R. 2004. Species and subspecies: What do they mean and why should we care? Iguana 11: 108–113.
  39. Powell, R. 2004. Species profile: The Ground Lizards of Isla Mona: Ameiva alboguttata. Iguana 11: 107.
  40. Powell, R. 2004. Species profile: Leiocephalus semilineatus. Iguana 11: 97.
  41. Powell, R. 2004. Species profile: Asian House Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus). Iguana 11: 20.
  42. Powell, R. 2004. Black Iguanas (Ctenosaura similis) in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Iguana 11: 16–19.
  43. Gifford, M. E., and R. Powell. 2004. Species profile: The Ground Lizards (Ameiva) of the Lower Barahona Peninsula. Iguana 11: 14–15.
  44. Powell, R. 2004. Species profile: Banded Sand Snakes (Chilomeniscus stramineus). Iguana 11: 7.
  45. Köhler, G., AJ Gutman, and R. Powell. 2003. Black Iguanas: Name and systematics. Iguana 10: 79–81.
  46. Powell, R. 2003. Exploitation of reptiles in the West Indies: A long history. Iguana 10: 67–70.
  47. Powell, R. 2003. Species profile: Utila's reptiles. Iguana 10: 36–38.
  48. Powell, R. 2002. Geographic distribution: Anolis carolinensis. Herpetological Review 33: 321.
  49. Powell, R. 2002. Species profile: Leiocephalus personatus. Iguana Times (Journal of the International Iguana Society) 9: 80.
  50. Ottenwalder, J. A., and R. Powell. 2002. Brief notes on the status of Hispaniolan Rhinoceros Iguanas, Cyclura cornuta. Iguana Times (Journal of the International Iguana Society) 9: 78.
  51. Powell, R., D. M. Nieves, M. E. Gifford, and B. E. Fontenot. 2002. The “Rhino Factory” at Manatí Park. Iguana Times (Journal of the International Iguana Society) 9: 75–77, 79, 81, back cover.
  52. Powell, R. 2002. Understanding animal classification. Iguana Times (Journal of the International Iguana Society) 9: 18–26.
  53. Malone, C. L., and R. Powell. 2002. Comments on a phylogeny of iguanid lizards. Iguana Times (Journal of the International Iguana Society) 9: 9–11.
  54. Pasachnik, S. A., J. J. Shew, J. H. Townsend, and R. Powell. 2002. Iguana delicatissima. Activity. Herpetological Review 33: 51–52.
  55. Powell, R., and E. J. Censky. 2002. Ameiva alboguttata. Arboreal activity. Herpetological Review 33: 50.
  56. Sifers, S. M., M. L. Yeska, and R. Powell. 2001. Eleutherodactylus abbotti. Pattern polymorphism. Herpetological Review 32: 180–181.
  57. Nava, S. S., K. V. D. Hodge, J. J. Shew, and R. Powell. 2001. Geographic distribution: Sphaerodactylus sputator. Herpetological Review 32: 121.
  58. Nava, S. S., J. J. Shew, and R. Powell. 2001. Geographic distribution: Sphaerodactylus parvus. Herpetological Review 32: 120–121.
  59. Eaton, J. M., K. G. Howard, and R. Powell. 2001. Geographic distribution: Anolis carolinensis. Herpetological Review 32: 118.
  60. Banbury, B. L., Y. M. Ramos, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. The Cyclura of Parque Nacional Isla Cabritos. Iguana Times (Journal of the International Iguana Society) 8(2): 3–7.
  61. Powell, R. and K. Lindsay. 1999. Geographic distribution. Gymnophthalmus underwoodi. Herpetological Review 30: 110.
  62. Powell, R. 1999. Natural history of some Anolis lizards: A summary of work in the last decade, pp. 105–109. In: J. B. Losos and M. Leal (eds.), Anolis Newsletter V. Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri.
  63. Glor, R. E., and R. Powell. 1999. Phylogenetic systematics of cybotes group anoles from Hispaniola, pp. 42–43. In: J. B. Losos and M. Leal (eds.), Anolis Newsletter V. Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri.
  64. Powell, R. 1998. On being a herpetologist at a small, private, undergraduate college. Newsletter of the Herpetologists' League 5(1): 5–6.
  65. Sproston, A. L., J. H. Greve, and R. Powell. 1997. Ameiva chrysolaema ficta. Parasitism. Herpetological Review 28: 201.
  66. Birt, R. A., J. H. Greve, and R. Powell. 1997. Anolis barkeri. Parasitism. Herpetological Review 28: 201.
  67. Powell, R., and R. Daniel. 1997. County distribution records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (10): 12–69.
  68. Powell, R., T. R. Johnson, and D. D. Smith. 1997. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1997. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (10): 8–12.
  69. Smith, D. D., and R. Powell. 1996. Cottonmouths at the Lake of the Ozarks, Camden County, Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (9): 15.
  70. Powell, R., T. R. Johnson, and D. D. Smith. 1996. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1996. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (9): 9–14.
  71. Powell, R., T. R. Johnson, and D. D. Smith. 1995. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1995. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (8): 9–12.
  72. Parsons, K. J., R. Powell, and J. H. Greve. 1995. Peltophryne guentheri. Parasitism. Herpetological Review 26: 31–32.
  73. Calderón, S., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D. D. Smith. 1994. Hemidactylus haitianus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae) from the Dominican Republic: Revisited after two years. Dactylus 2: 113–116.
  74. Powell, R. 1994. Updated size records for amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Appendix. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1994. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (7): 7–9.
  75. Powell, R., T. R. Johnson, and D. D. Smith. 1994. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1994. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (7): 5–7.
  76. Smith, J. W., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., D. D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1994. Natural history notes on a population of Anolis olssoni (Sauria: Polychrotidae) from the Dominican Republic. Bulletin of the Maryland Herpetological Society 30: 67–75.
  77. Cullen, D. J., and R. Powell. 1994. A comparison of food habits of a montane and a lowland population of Anolis distichus (Lacertilia: Polychrotidae) from the Dominican Republic. Bulletin of the Maryland Herpetological Society 30: 62–66.
  78. Bowersox, S. R., S. Calderón, G. Cisper, R. S. Garcia, C. Huntington, A. Lathrop, L. Lenart, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. Powell, A. Queral, D. D. Smith, S. P. Sowell, and K. C. Zippel. 1994. Miscellaneous natural history notes on amphibians and reptiles from the Dominican Republic. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 29: 54–55.
  79. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1993. In the spotlight: Hemidactylus haitianus Meerwarth, 1901. Dactylus 2: 54–55.
  80. Powell, R., P. J. Hall, D. D. Smith, and J. Riley. 1993. The occurrence of Raillietiella sp. (Pentastomida: Cephalobaenida) in Hemidactylus haitianus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae) from Hispaniola. Dactylus 2: 51–53.
  81. Smith, D. D., and R. Powell. 1993. Life history observations of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (6): 27–30.
  82. Powell, R. T. R. Johnson, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1993. Updated distribution maps for amphibians and reptiles in Missouri. Appendix. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1993. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (6): 7–26.
  83. Powell, R., T. R. Johnson, and D. D. Smith. 1993. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1993. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (6): 3–7.
  84. Thornhill, S. G., and R. Powell. 1993. Geographic distribution: Eumeces obsoletus. Herpetological Review 24: 108.
  85. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1993. Anolis chlorocyanus. Aquatic activity. Herpetological Review 24: 59.
  86. Powell, R. 1993. Herpetological records. Bulletin of the Kansas City Herpetological Society 2(2): 4.
  87. Powell, R., and R. W. Henderson. 1992. Anolis gingivinus. Nocturnal behavior. Herpetological Review 23: 117.
  88. Moster, J. A., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., D. D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1992. Natural history notes on a small population of Anolis brevirostris (Sauria: Polychridae) from altered habitat in the Dominican Republic. Bulletin of the Maryland Herpetological Society 28: 150–161.
  89. Powell, R., T. R. Johnson, and D. D. Smith. 1992. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1991. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (5): 6–13.
  90. Burns, J. K., C. A. Cunningham, R. A. Dupuis, M. N. Trask, J. S. Tulloch, R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., K. L. Kopecky, and M. L. Jolley. 1992. Lizards of the Cayos Siete Hermanos, Dominican Republic, Hispaniola. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 27: 225–232.
  91. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1992. In the spotlight: Aristelliger lar Cope, 1862. Dactylus 1(3): 37–38.
  92. Powell, R. 1992. Geographic distribution: Virginia valeriae elegans. Herpetological Review 23: 93.
  93. Parmerlee, J. S., Jr., R. Powell, D. D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1992. Unusual behavior in the Cuban Green Anole, Anolis porcatus (Sauria: Polychridae). Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 27: 118.
  94. Powell, R., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., L. R. White, and D. D. Smith. 1992. Notes on neonate Tropidophis haetianus (Squamata: Serpentes: Tropidophiidae) from Hispaniola. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 27: 116–117.
  95. Smith, D. D., and R. Powell. 1991. Geographic distribution: Uromacer frenatus. Herpetological Review 22: 135–136.
  96. Powell, R., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., D. D. Smith, and A. J. Lathrop. 1991. Geographic distribution: Anolis chlorocyanus. Herpetological Review 22: 134–135.
  97. Smith, D. D., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. Powell, L. R. White, and A. Lathrop. 1991. Tropidophis haetianus. Locomotion. Herpetological Review 22: 132–133.
  98. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1991. Anolis chlorocyanus. Behavior. Herpetological Review 22: 130.
  99. Smith, D. D., R. Powell, P. A. Zani, and A. Lathrop. 1991. Osteopilus dominicensis. Behavior. Herpetological Review 22: 129.
  100. Powell, R. 1991. On the status of the Northern Fence Lizard, Sceloporus undulatus hyacinthinus, in Jackson County, Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (4): 11–12.
  101. Powell, R., T. R. Johnson, and D. D. Smith. 1991. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1991. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (4): 5–10.
  102. Lynxwiler, J. R., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D. D. Smith. 1991. Notes on the natural history of Hemidactylus brookii haitianus from the Dominican Republic. Dactylus 1(1): 2–9.
  103. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1991. Geographic distribution: Anolis porcatus. Herpetological Review 22: 65.
  104. Cusumano, M. A., D. J. Pflanz, and R. Powell. 1991. Anolis whitemani. Tail autotomy. Herpetological Review 22: 58.
  105. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1991. Reproduction in Clonophis kirtlandii (Serpentes: Colubridae). Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 26: 32.
  106. Powell, R. 1990. Geographic distribution: Anolis porcatus. Herpetological Review 21: 96.
  107. Powell, R. 1990. Anolis porcatus. Behavior. Herpetological Review 21: 93.
  108. Pflanz, D. J., and R. Powell. 1990. Death feigning by a coachwhip from Missouri. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (3): 12.
  109. Powell, R., T. R. Johnson, and D. D. Smith. 1990. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1989. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (3): 4–8.
  110. Cisek, J. M., C. A. Cunningham, R. A. Dupuis, R. P. Seibolt, and R. Powell. 1990. Wetmorena haitiana. Food habits. Herpetological Review 21: 62.
  111. Powell, R., D. J. Pflanz, J. H. Greve, and D. D. Smith. 1990. Leiocephalus semilineatus. Parasitism. Herpetological Review 21: 60–61.
  112. Powell, R., T. R. Johnson, and D. D. Smith. 1989. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1989. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (2): 4–8.
  113. Carr, D. K., R. Powell, J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., and D. D. Smith. 1989. Anolis whitemani. Food habits. Herpetological Review 20: 49, 52.
  114. Powell, R., S. S. Duer, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and D.D.Smith. 1989. Ameiva taeniura. Food habits. Herpetological Review 20: 49.
  115. Powell, R., S. G. Thornhill, and D. D. Smith. 1989. Geographic distribution: Sphaerodactylus altavelensis altavelensis. Herpetological Review 20: 13.
  116. Powell, R., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., P. Ward, and D. D. Smith. 1989. Geographic distribution: Anolis whitemani whitemani. Herpetological Review 20: 12.
  117. Johnson, T. R., and R. Powell. 1988. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Missouri for 1988. Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter (1): 4–8.
  118. Laposha, N. A., J. S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. Powell, and D. D. Smith. 1985. Nerodia erythrogaster transversa. Reproduction. Herpetological Review 16: 81.
  119. Smith, D. D., N. A. Laposha, R. Powell, and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1985. Crotalus molossus. Anomaly. Herpetological Review 16: 78–79.
  120. Powell, R. 1985. Geographic distribution: Hemidactylium scutatum. Herpetological Review 16: 83.
  121. Powell, R., and S. Phillips. 1984. Sternotherus odoratus. Reproduction. Herpetological Review 15: 51.
  122. Smith, D. D., and R. Powell. 1983. Acris crepitans blanchardi. Anomalies. Herpetological Review 14: 118–119.
  123. Jolley, M. L., R. Powell, and D. D. Smith. 1983. Diadophis punctatus arnyi. Coloration. Herpetological Review 14: 119–120.
  124. Powell, R., and D. D. Smith. 1983. Geographic distribution: Thamnophis radix haydeni. Herpetological Review 14: 85.
  125. Laposha, N.A., and R. Powell. 1982. Virginia valeriae. Size. Herpetological Review 13: 97.
  126. Powell, R. 1982. Thamnophis proximus. Reproduction. Herpetological Review 13: 48.
  127. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1980. Geographic distribution: Anolis limifrons. Herpetological Review 11: 115.
  128. Parmerlee, J.S., Jr., and R. Powell. 1980. Geographic distribution: Sphaerodactylus glaucus. Herpetological Review 11: 115–116.
  129. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1980. Geographic distribution: Conophis lineatus. Herpetological Review 11: 116.
  130. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1980. Geographic distribution: Crotalus durissus. Herpetological Review 11: 116.
  131. Parmerlee, J.S., Jr., and R. Powell. 1980. Geographic distribution: Elaphe triaspis. Herpetological Review 11: 116.
  132. Powell, R., and J. S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1980. Geographic distribution: Oxybelis aeneus. Herpetological Review 11: 116.
  133. Powell, R. 1980. Kansas size record for the Black Rat Snake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter 35: 12.
  134. Powell, R. 1980. Geographic distribution: Pseudacris triseriata. Herpetological Review 11: 35.
  135. Powell, R., and H. L. Gregory. 1978. Emergency: Snakebite. Venomous snakes of Missouri and Kansas. American National Red Cross, Kansas City, Missouri. 6 pp.
  136. Powell, R., D. Stern, R. S. Myers, and M. Stern. 1972. Mammals of Lake Jacomo Park. Jackson County Parks Department, Lee's Summit, Missouri. 12 pp.

IUCN RED LISTINGS

  1. Powell, R. and R.W. Henderson. 2011. Typhlops tasymicris. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2. .
  2. Powell, R. and R.W. Henderson. 2011. Sphaerodactylus kirbyi. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2. .
  3. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2011. Leiocephalus greenwayi. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  4. Powell, R. and R.W. Henderson. 2011. Gonatodes daudini. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2. .
  5. Hedges, S.B., G.C. Mayer, and R. Powell. 2011. Anolis oculatus. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  6. Mayer, G.C., S.B. Hedges, and R. Powell. 2011. Anolis nubilis. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  7. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, R.M. Castañeda, and G.C. Mayer. 2011. Anolis marron. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  8. de Queiroz, K., R. Powell, S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2011. Anolis juangundlachi. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  9. Powell, R., R.M. Castañeda, and G.C. Mayer. 2011. Anolis haetianus. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  10. Powell, R., G.C. Mayer, and S.B. Hedges. 2011. Anolis guafe. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  11. Powell, R. 2011. Cyclura onchiopsis. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  12. Mayer, G.C., S.B. Hedges, and R. Powell. 2010. Sphaerodactylus williamsi. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  13. Powell, R. and V. Wallach. 2009. Typhlops capitulatus. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  14. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Tropidophis pardalis. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  15. Powell, R., G.C. Mayer, and S.B. Hedges. 2009. Tropidophis hendersoni. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  16. Powell, R. 2009. Tarentola americana. In IUCN 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  17. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus vincenti. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  18. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus torrei. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  19. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus thompsoni. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  20. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus streptophorus. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  21. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus storeyae. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  22. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus scaber. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  23. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus savagei. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  24. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus richardi. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  25. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus pimienta. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  26. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus nicholsi. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  27. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus klauberi. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  28. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus goniorhynchus. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  29. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus difficilis. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  30. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus corticola. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  31. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus callocricus. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  32. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Sphaerodactylus armasi. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  33. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Leiocephalus schreibersii. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  34. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Leiocephalus melanochlorus. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  35. Powell, R. and S.B. Hedges. 2009. Celestus sepsoides. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  36. Powell, R. and S.B. Hedges. 2009. Celestus curtissi. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  37. Powell, R. and S.B. Hedges. 2009. Celestus crusculus. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  38. Rodríguez Schettino, L., S.B. Hedges, R. Powell, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Caraiba andreae. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  39. Hedges, S.B., G.C. Mayer, R. Powell, and L. Rodríguez Schettino. 2009. Arrhyton taeniatum. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  40. Powell, R., S.B. Hedges, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Aristelliger lar. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  41. Hedges, S.B., R. Powell, and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Anolis koopmani. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  42. Hedges, S.B. and R. Powell. 2009. Anolis longiceps. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  43. Powell, R. and S.B. Hedges. 2009. Amphisbaena schmidti. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  44. Powell, R. and S.B. Hedges. 2009. Amphisbaena hyporissor. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  45. Powell, R. and S.B. Hedges. 2009. Ameiva maynardii. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  46. Powell, R. and S.B. Hedges. 2009. Ameiva lineolata. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  47. Powell, R. and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Ameiva corvina. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  48. Powell, R. and G.C. Mayer. 2009. Ameiva corax. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  49. Powell, R. and S.B. Hedges. 2009. Ameiva chrysolaema. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  50. Hedges, S.B., G.C. Mayer, and R. Powell. 2009. Alsophis sanctonum. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  51. Solís, F., R. Ibáñez, C. Jaramillo, Q. Fuenmayor, C. Azevedo-Ramos, E. La Marca, L. A. Coloma, S. Ron, J. D. Hardy, Jr., S. B. Hedges, B. Ibéné, M. Breuil, and R. Powell. 2008. Scinax ruber . In IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. < www.iucnredlist.org >.
  52. Solís, F., R. Ibáñez, G. Hammerson, S. B. Hedges, A. Diesmos, M. Matsui, J.-M. Hero, S. Richards, L. A. Coloma, S. Ron, E. La Marca, J. D. Hardy, Jr., R. Powell , F. Bolaños, and G. Chaves. 2008. Rhinella marina . In IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  53. McGinnity, D. and R. Powell. 2004. Celestus warreni. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  54. McGinnity, D. and R. Powell. 2004. Celestus anelpistus. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  55. Hedges, B. and R. Powell. 2004. Pristimantisshrevei. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  56. Hedges, B. and R. Powell. 2004. Pristimantis euphronides. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  57. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Peltophryne guentheri. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  58. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Peltophryne fracta. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  59. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Peltophryne fluviatica. In IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  60. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Osteopilus vastus. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  61. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Osteopilus pulchrilineata. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  62. Fa, J., B. Hedges, B. Ibéné, M. Breuil, R. Powell, and C. Magin. 2004. Leptodactylus fallax. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  63. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Leptodactylus dominicensis. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  64. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Hypsiboas heilprini. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  65. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus wetmorei. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  66. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus thorectes. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  67. Hedges, B. and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus shrevei. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  68. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus schmidti. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  69. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus ruthae. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  70. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus rufifemoralis. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  71. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus pituinus. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  72. Hedges, B., B. Ibéné, M. Breuil, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus pinchoni. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  73. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus patriciae. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  74. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus parapelates. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  75. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus nortoni. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  76. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus montanus. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  77. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus minutus. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  78. Hedges, B., B. Ibéné, M. Breuil, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus martinicensis. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  79. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus leoncei. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  80. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus jugans. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  81. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus hypostenor. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  82. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus heminota. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  83. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus haitianus. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  84. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus glanduliferoides. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  85. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus furcyensis. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  86. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus fowleri. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  87. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus flavescens. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  88. Hedges, B. and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus euphronides. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  89. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus eunaster. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  90. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus darlingtoni. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  91. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus counouspeus. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  92. Hedges, B., R. Joglar, R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus coqui. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  93. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus chlorophenax. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  94. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus brevirostris. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  95. Hedges, B., B. Ibéné, M. Breuil, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus barlagnei. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  96. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus bakeri. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  97. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus auriculatoides. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  98. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus audanti. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  99. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, M. Hernández, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus armstrongi. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  100. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus apostates. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  101. Hedges, B. and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus amplinympha. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  102. Hedges, B., R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus amadeus. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  103. Hedges, B., S. Incháustegui, R. Thomas, and R. Powell. 2004. Eleutherodactylus alcoae. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .
  104. Hedges, B., B. Ibéné, M. Breuil, and R. Powell. 2004. Allobates chalcopis. In IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. .

REPORTS

  1. Foust, R. D., Jr., R. Powell, R. Hannigan, and D. Gray. 2004. National Science Foundation Directorate for Biological Sciences, REU/UMEB Sites in Biology, PI Meeting. Final Report. National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia. 35 pp.
  2. Powell, R., J. Doctor, M. A. Whaley, J. L. Schottel, C. C. Barney, and B. Jackson. 2000. National Science Foundation, Biological Science Directorate, REU Sites in Biology, Directors' Meeting. Final Report. National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia. 31 pp.
  3. Barney, C. C., B.-A. Battelle, D. Bynum, R. Powell, and M. Stiassny. 1993. National Science Foundation REU Site Directors' Meeting. Final Report. National Science Foundation, Washington, D.C. i + 27 pp.

TRANSLATIONS

  1. Werner, F. 1913. The iguana. Historical Perspectives (includes a 'biographical sketch' of Emílio Goeldi). Iguana 11: 55–59 (translated from German 2004).
  2. Werner, F. 1913. Iguanas of the Galápagos Islands (with extensive quotations from Charles Darwin). Historical Perspectives (includes a 'biographical sketch' of Franz Werner). Iguana 10: 145–150 (translated from German 2003).
  3. Werner, F. 1913. Whorl-tailed Iguanas. Historical Perspectives (includes a 'biographical sketch' of Raymond L. Ditmars). Iguana 10: 89–92 (translated from German 2003).
  4. Werner, F. 1913. The Black Iguana. Historical Perspectives. Iguana 10: 56–57 (translated from German 2003).

POPULAR ARTICLES

  1. Censky, E. J., and R. Powell. 2001. Little black dragons of Little Scrub Island. Fauna 2(3): 24–31.
  2. Powell, R. 2000. Horned Iguanas of the Caribbean. Reptile & Amphibian Hobbyist 5(12): 30–37.
  3. Powell, R. 1999. Croc! Boy's Life, April 1999: 40–43.
  4. Powell, R. 1996. My favorite lizards. Boy's Life, August 1996: 10–13.

ADDITIONAL PUBLICATIONS BY UNDERGRADUATES UNDER MY DIRECTION

  1. Les, A. M. 2013. Anolis sagrei (Cuban Brown Anole). Aggressive behavior. Herpetological Review 44: 137–138.
  2. Hillbrand, P. A., A. T. Sloan, and W. K. Hayes. 2011. The terrestrial reptiles of San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Reptiles & Amphibians 18: 154–166.
  3. Wright, E. 2011. Sombrero: Lizards among the ruins. Reptiles & Amphibians 18: 42–51.
  4. Quinn, D. P., A. L. McTaggart, T. A. Bellah, E. J. Bentz, L. G. Chambers, H. D. Hedman, R. R. John, D. N. Muñiz Pagan, and M. J. Rivera Rodríguez. 2010. The reptiles of Union Island, St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Reptiles & Amphibians 17: 222–233.
  5. Ackley, J. W. 2008. Most by land, some by sea: Photographing the obscure in Dominica. Iguana 15: 162–169.
  6. White, L. A., and P. J. Muelleman . 2008. Juvenile pattern and ontogenetic pattern changes in Dominican Racers. Iguana 15: 157–159.
  7. Daniells, E. A., J. W. Ackley, R. E. Carter, P. J. Muelleman, S. M. Rudman, P. A. Turk, N. J. Vélez Espinet, L. A. White, and N. N. Wyszynski. 2008. An annotated checklist of the amphibians and reptiles of Dominica, West Indies. Iguana 15: 130–141.
  8. Pansza, J. M. 2007. A Costa Rican adventure. Iguana 14: 38–42.
  9. Treglia, M. L. 2006. An annotated checklist of the amphibians and reptiles of St. Vincent, West Indies. Iguana 13: 251–262.
  10. Muensch, A. J., D. Werth, P. Leininger, A. Fawks, and S. Thomas. 2006. The anoles of Coconut Island, Kane‘ohe Bay, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i. Iguana 13: 198–205.
  11. Savit, A. Z. 2006. Reptiles of the Santa Lucia Cloud Forest, Ecuador. Iguana 13: 94–103.
  12. Banbury, B. L., and Y. M. Ramos. 2005. The Rock Iguanas of Parque Nacional Isla Cabritos. Iguana 12: 256–261.
  13. Savit, A. Z. 2005. Northern Perú: Ocean to mountains to Amazonian rainforest. Iguana 12: 187-193.
  14. Powell, M. A. 2005. A Yucatecan adventure. Iguana 12: 114–117, 120–122.
  15. Powell, M. A. 2005. Mayan reptiles. Iguana 12: 112–114.
  16. Savit, A. Z. 2004. [Review of:] Lizards: Windows to the Evolution of Diversity, by E. R. Pianka and L. J. Vitt. Iguana 11: 183–184.
  17. Maley, A. J. 2004. Species profile: Alsophis rufiventris. Iguana 11: 147.
  18. Howard, K. G., J. M. Eaton, S. C. Larimer, and J. H. Townsend. 2001. Geographic distribution: Alsophis rijgersmaei. Herpetological Review 32: 121.
  19. Lenart, L. A., and S. P. Sowell. 1996. Anoline diversity in three differentially altered habitats in the Sierra de Baoruco, Dominican Republic, Hispaniola (abstracts in English, Spanish, and French), pp. 442–443. In: R. Powell and R. W. Henderson (eds.), Contributions to West Indian Herpetology: A Tribute to Albert Schwartz. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Contributions to Herpetology, volume 12. Ithaca, New York.
  20. Parsons, K. J. 1995. Peltophryne guentheri. Diet. Herpetological Review 26: 202.
  21. Huntington, C., and G. L. Cisper. 1994. A new host and locality record for Eimeria leiocephali (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina) with comments on the type-host. Caribbean Journal of Science 30: 152.
  22. Huntington, C., T. N. Stuhlman, and D. J. Cullen. 1993. Plethodon sequoyah. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (557): 1–2.
Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) - Summer Internship

Research Experiences for Undergraduates
Natural History of a West Indian Herpetofauna

REU PHILOSOPHY

Our REU philosophy is best summarized as a composite of four basic statements: (1) participating students are to be afforded the opportunity to engage fully in the complete scientific process, from conceiving an idea, implementing an investigation, to analyzing and presenting cogently their results; (2) students will think, not accept information passively, but question, analyze, and test via applications of their newly acquired knowledge and skills; (3) they shall enjoy the experience; and (4) they will presented with information and guidance to facilitate their exploration of career options. If, in the process, the participating faculty receive support for their own research interests, so much the better.

In practice, students must acquire a working knowledge of the fundamental principles and associated terminology of a given research area. Much of this material is best gleaned from the primary literature, which students must learn to use effectively. Higher-level thinking skills (e.g., integration, analysis, and decision-making) must be explained, modeled, and practiced. These activities (and these are active processes) are almost always best accomplished in the biological sciences by letting and encouraging (and occasionally forcing) the students to get their hands dirty.

As learning is an incremental process during which the student builds on a known foundation by making connections with new, previously unknown, but related information and skills, frequent feedback is essential, initially under circumstances entailing limited risk. Minimizing risk and providing frequent feedback enhances the student's opportunity for success. A challenge is provided by the very nature of the scientific endeavor—and research is, of course, at the very heart of science. The role of the faculty in this learning progression is to encourage an ever-increasing independence by shifting their own roles from initial guidance through facilitation and, finally, to mere assistance. 

In summary, students will be challenged to succeed in the program and in pursuit of career goals as they learn to “do science” by establishing a knowledge base and then applying that knowledge and related skills to very real and stimulating research projects.

 

PREVIOUS REU PROGRAMS AT AVILA UNIVERSITY

 

Avila University has sponsored ten previous REU Programs in 1991, 1993, 1995, and 1999 to the Dominican Republic, 2000 to Anguilla, 2002 to Grenada, 2004 to St. Eustatius, 2006 to St. Vincent, 2008 to Dominica, 2010 to Union Island in the Grenadines, and 2012 to Eleuthera Island in the Bahamas. A total of 101 students from 68 different colleges and universities have participated.

Betsy Cast (William Woods College) searches for lizards in Dominican rainforest.

 

All participants in Avila REU Programs have published the results of their research in scientific journals (or will, in the case of the 2010 participants). See the list of student-authored publications listed below.

Scott Sowell (University of North Florida) and Bob Powell look for hybrid anoles in a palm in Barahona, Dominican Republic

 

The Avila University REU Programs include 1–2 weeks of training and preparation, 3 weeks in the tropics, and 5 weeks devoted to data analysis and the preparation of presentations and manuscripts.

Tim Fobes (left, Northwest Missouri StateUniversity), Mike Schreiber (with camera, Rockhurst University), Hua Bui (blue shirt, University of Missouri-Kansas City), and Pete Zani (kneeling, Miami University) look on as Lisa White (Miami-Dade Community College) and Bob Powell discuss a recently captured specimen.

 

Research projects are chosen, designed, and implemented by students under the guidance of faculty with experience in herpetological research. 

Kim Schneider (University of Florida) and Andrew Hardwick (Fontbonne College) use a "paint-gun" to spray lizards in order to estimate population sizes.

Most projects have addressed aspects of natural history of frogs and squamate reptiles but, triggered by the diverse interests of participants, topics have ranged far afield — descriptions of new parasites and studies of the phylogeny of an introduced species, hybridization, and behavior.

Matt Gifford (Avila University) searches for sleeping lizards at night.

Study sites in the Dominican Republic have ranged from high-elevation pine- and cloudforests, mid-elevation rainforests, to low-elevation deserts.

Roland Sosa (San Diego State University and Loma Linda University) removes an interloper from a "sticky trap" placed to catch secretive, nocturnal lizards. Roland participated in the '95 program and joined the '99 program as a member of the faculty.

In 2000, we conducted research on Anguilla, where the herpetofauna is considerably less diverse than on Hispaniola. In addition to work on native species, we also documented the colonization of two exotic forms introduced by humans.

Stesha Pasachnik (Earlham College) uses a cliffside vantage point to observe activity of critically endangered Anguillian iguanas (Iguana delicatissima).

  

  Even on a small island like Anguilla, environmental conditions vary from site to site, affecting the relationships between animals and the local climate.

April White (Southwest Missouri State University) seeks to capture an Anguillian Ground Lizard (Ameiva plei) using a noose fashioned from a fishing pole (upper left). The noosed lizards (upper right) were unceremoniously subjected to having their temperatures taken (lower) for a study of thermal biology.

The fieldwork is intense, although students have been known to take a break by visiting the beach or playing tourist.

Saul Nava (University of Texas at El Paso) collects data on the microhabitat of a Dwarf Gecko (Sphaerodactylus parvus).

Although this hillside on Grenada looks like pristine forest, all except the steepest slopes have been converted to agriculture — in this case, banana and nutmeg (the latter contributing to Grenada becoming known as the "spice island").

Jenny Germano (Miami University) and Jenn Sander (Lee University) collect data on the composition of herpetofaunal communities in variously altered habitats.

Although the tropical sun is intense, students soon become acclimated to the climate.

Brian Greene (Wofford College) works to noose a Grenadian Ground Lizard (Ameiva ameiva).

Sometimes field studies require getting to know your subjects.

Kate Williamson (Ohio Wesleyan University) holds an anole (Anolis aeneus).

 

Higher elevations on The Quill, a 600-m high volcanic peak on St. Eustatius, support diverse biotic communities. 

 

Aaron Savit ( St. John's College, now at Earlham College) watches a Red-bellied Racer (Alsophis rufiventris) forage through the litter on the slopes of The Quill. 

 

Projects often include methods used to estimate population sizes.

Sarah Wissman ( University of New England, left) and Randa Hensley ( Haskell Indian Nations University) laying out a transect on the slopes of The Quill.

  

Low areas on tropical islands are often very dry. 

Trevor Joyce ( University of Alaska) conducted a study in the dry, rugged hills of the Boven sector on St. Eustatius. 

 

"Doing" biology means getting to know your subjects. 

Pamela Medina Díaz ( University of Puerto Rico) and a Red-bellied Racer (Alsophis rufiventris).

Mark-recapture projects involve catching animals that often don't cooperate. 

Angela Kerr ( Western Illinois University) attempting to noose a Ground Lizard (Ameiva erythrocephala).

 

Technology is helpful when videotaping the foraging behavior of treeboas at night. 

Alex Muensch (Avila University) and Helen Arnold (Arkansas State University-Beebe) try to follow a Cook's Treeboa (Corallus cookii) as it forages for sleeping lizards on St. Vincent.

Some subjects of research projects are not shy. 

Alex Muensch ( Avila University) and a Cook's Treeboa (Corallus cookii).

 

Assessing population densities and microhabitat associations involves marking animals (in this case, with a "paintgun"). 

Carlos Rodríguez (University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras) "shoots" an anole high overhead on a palm tree.

  

Close personal contact with the research subject isn't usually recommended. 

Chris Mallery ( Willam Patterson University) and a Green Iguana (Iguana iguana).

 

Sometimes you have to hike to a study site.

David Steinberg (Vanderbilt University) and Jessica Hite (University of Tennessee) return from sampling plots for Dwarf Geckos (Sphaerodactylus vincenti).

  

Getting to know your research subjects is important. 

Sylvia Powell (Earlham College) and Mike Treglia (Cornell University) examined habitat associations of Cook's Treeboas (Corallus cookii).

 

For some types of studies you have to get your hands on your subjects.

Esther Daniells (Colorado State University) draws blood for DNA analysis from a Lesser Antillean Iguana (Iguana delicatissima) on Dominica. Lyndon Prince, who is working on a long-term study of iguanas on Dominica, is holding the iguana.

  

Recognizing individuals can be critically important. 

Patrick Turk (Avila University) and Natalie Wyszinski (University of Tennessee) are painting a number on a Lesser Antillean Iguana (Iguana delicatissima) to facilitate individual recognition.

 

Fieldwork in the tropics can be hot and sweaty.

Nelson Vélez (University of Puerto Rico) marks a Dominican Anole (Anolis oculatus) with a unique paint pattern in order to trace individual movements and behavior.

  

Although often not the focus of any project, encounters with rarely seen species can add some spice to the tropical experience. 

Seth Rudman (University of Rochester) examining a Dominican Clouded Boa (Boa nebulosa) up close.

 

Getting to some animals requires a willingness to crawl into tight spots.

Ehren Bentz (Feather River College, now at Oregon State University) trying to catch a crevice-dwelling Union Island Gecko (Gonatodes daudini).

  

Accurate data are critically important. 

Audrey McTaggart (McPherson College) records the number of litter-dwelling lizards encountered in a plot sample.

 

A photographic record of encounters is important in documenting new findings.

Mel Rivera (University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez) photographs a White Snake (Mastigodryas bruesi) encountered during a survey of a critical habitat in the area above Chatham Bay on Union Island.

  

Unexpected encounters can provide valuable data. 

Tess Bellah (Avila University) holds a Grenada Bank Treeboa (Corallus grenadensis) found along the trail to Bloody Bay, where students were hoping to see nesting Leatherback Sea Turtles (Dermochelys coriacea).

 

Sometimes you have to make sacrifices to catch animals.

Ehren Bentz (Feather River College, now at Oregon State University) with a Green Iguana (Iguana iguana) found on the Tobago Cays during a snorkeling trip.

 

PUBLICATIONS BY UNDERGRADUATE PARTICIPANTS IN AVILA REU PROGRAMS
(names of undergraduate participants are in bold type)

  1. Ackley, J.W. 2008. Most by land, some by sea: Photographing the obscure in Dominica. Iguana 15: 162–169. 
  2. Ackley, J.W., P.J. Muelleman, R.E. Carter, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2009. A rapid assessment of herpetofaunal diversity in variously altered habitats on Dominica. Applied Herpetology 6: 171–184. 
  3. Banbury, B.L. and Y.M. Ramos. 2005. The Rock Iguanas of Parque Nacional Isla Cabritos. Iguana 12: 256–261 
  4. Banbury, B.L., Y.M. Ramos, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. The Cyclura of Parque Nacional Isla Cabritos. Iguana Times (J. Internatl. Iguana Soc.) 8(2): 3–7. 
  5. Bentz, E.J., M.J. Rivera Rodríguez, R.R. John, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. Population densities, activity, microhabitats, and thermal biology of a unique crevice and litter-dwelling assemblage of reptiles on Union Island, St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 6: 40–50.
  6. Bowersox, S.R., S. Calderón, G. Cisper, R.S. Garcia, C. Huntington, A. Lathrop, L. Lenart, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. Powell, A. Queral, D.D. Smith, S.P. Sowell, and K.C. Zippel. 1994. Miscellaneous natural history notes on amphibians and reptiles from the Dominican Republic. Bull. Chicago Herpetol. Soc. 29: 54–55. 
  7. Bowersox, S.R., S. Calderón, R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., D.D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1994. Nahrung eines Riesenanolis, Anolis barahonae, von Hispaniola, mit einer Zusammenfassung des Nahrungsspektrums westindischer Riesenanolis-Arten. Salamandra 30: 155–160.
  8. Brennan, A.M., E.J. Censky, and R. Powell. 2009. Effects of chigger mite (Acari: Trombiculidae) infections on Ameiva (Squamata: Teiidae) from the Anguilla Bank. Contemporary Herpetology 2009(1): 1–3. 
  9. Bui, H.T., R. Powell, D.D. Smith, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and A. Lathrop. 1992. A new coccidian parasite (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina) from Anolis distichus (Sauria: Polychridae) in the Dominican Republic. J. Parasitol. 78: 784–785.
  10. Bui, H.T., D.D. Smith, R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and A. Lathrop. 1992. A redescription of Eimeria helenlevineae (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Hemidactylus brooki haitianus (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Hispaniola. Carib. J. Sci. 28: 109–110. 
  11. Calderón, S., S.R. Bowersox, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis barahonae. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (609): 1–3. 
  12. Calderón, S., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D.D. Smith. 1994. Hemidactylus haitianus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae) from the Dominican Republic: revisited after two years. Dactylus 2: 113–116. 
  13. Carter, R.E., C.S. Berg, J.W. Ackley, and R. Powell. 2009. Frogs of Dominica, with notes on habitat use by two species of Eleutherodactylus. Herpetological Bulletin (108): 14–23. 
  14. Carter, R.E., H. Kaiser, and R. Powell. 2009. Eleutherodactylus amplinympha. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (864): 1–4. 
  15. Cast, E.E., M.E. Gifford, K.R. Schneider, A.J. Hardwick, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2000. Natural history of an anoline lizard community in the Sierra de Baoruco, República Dominicana. Carib. J. Sci. 36: 258–266. 
  16. Cisper, G.L., C. Huntington, D.D. Smith, R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and A. Lathrop. 1995. Four new Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from anoles (Lacertilia: Polychrotidae) in the Dominican Republic. J. Parasitol. 81: 252–255.
  17. Daniells, E.A., J.W. Ackley, R.E. Carter, P.J. Muelleman, S.M. Rudman, P.A. Turk, N.J. Vélez Espinet, L.A. White, and N.N. Wyszynski. 2008. An annotated checklist of the amphibians and reptiles of Dominica, West Indies. Iguana 15: 130–141.
  18. Daniells, E.A., N.J. Vélez Espinet, R.S. Thorpe, and R. Powell. 2009. Sphaerodactylus fantasticus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (875): 1–8. 
  19. Díaz-Lameiro, A.M., H. Kaiser, and R. Powell. 2008. Pristimantis shrevei. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (844): 1–4.
  20. Díaz-Lameiro, A.M. , R. Powell, and Craig S. Berg. 2007. Colour and pattern polymorphism in Pristimantis shrevei and Eleutherodactylus johnstonei (Leptodactylidae) on St. Vincent, West Indies. Herpetological Bulletin (101): 18–25. 
  21. Eaton, J.M., K.G. Howard, and R. Powell. 2001. Geographic distribution: Anolis carolinensis. Herpetol. Rev. 32: 118. 
  22. Eaton, J.M., S.C. Larimer, K.G. Howard, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2002. Population densities and ecological release of a solitary species: Anolis gingivinus on Anguilla, West Indies. Carib. J. Sci. 38: 27–36. 
  23. Fobes, T.M., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1993. Anolis cybotes. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (564): 1–5. 
  24. Fobes, T.M., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D.D. Smith. 1992. Natural history of Anolis cybotes (Sauria: Polychridae) in a disturbed habitat in Barahona, Dominican Republic. Carib. J. Sci. 28: 200–207. 
  25. Fogarty, S.P., V.H. Zero, and R. Powell. 2004. Revisiting St. Eustatius: Estimating the population size of Lesser Antillean Iguanas ( Iguana delicatissima ). Iguana 11: 138–146. 
  26. Garcia, R., A. Queral, R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., D.D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1994. Evidence of hybridization among green anoles (Lacertilia: Polychrotidae) from Hispaniola. Carib. J. Sci. 30: 279–281. 
  27. Germano, J.M., J.M. Sander, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2003. Herpetofaunal communities in Grenada: A comparison of altered sites, with an annotated checklist of Grenadian amphibians and reptiles. Carib. J. Sci. 39: 68–76. 
  28. Gifford, M.E. and R. Powell. 2002. Anolis longitibialis. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (749): 1–4. 
  29. Gifford, M.E. and R. Powell. 2002. Anolis sheplani. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (750): 1–2. 
  30. Gifford, M.E., Y.M. Ramos, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2003 ("2002"). Natural history of a saxicolous anole, Anolis longitibialis from Hispaniola. Herpetol. Nat. Hist. 9: 15–20. 
  31. Glor, R.E., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1998. Cyclura ricordii. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (657): 1–3. 
  32. Glor, R.E., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. Cyclura cornuta. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (709): 1–6.
  33. Greene, B.T., R. Powell, and R.W. Henderson. 2003. Mastigodryas bruesi. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (777): 1–3.
  34. Greene, B.T., D.T. Yorks, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. Powell, and R.W. Henderson. 2002. Discovery of Anolis sagrei in Grenada with comments on its potential impact on native anoles. Carib. J. Sci. 38: 270–272. 
  35. Harris, B.R., D.T. Yorks, C.A. Bohnert, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2004. Population densities and structural habitats in lowland populations of Anolis lizards on Grenada. Carib. J. Sci. 40: 31–40. 
  36. Hartley, L.M., R.E. Glor, A.L. Sproston, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. Germination rates of seeds consumed by two species of Rock Iguanas (Cyclura spp.) in the Dominican Republic. Carib. J. Sci. 36: 149–151. 
  37. Hartley, L.M., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee. 1998. Ameiva lineolata. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (654): 1–4. 
  38. Hedman, H.D., D.N. Muñiz Pagan, and R. Powell. 2010. Chelonoidis carbonaria (Red-footed Tortoise). Size and thermal biology. Herpetological Review 41: 484–485.
  39. Heinz, H.M., A.J. Maley, A.Z. Savit, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2004. Behaviour and time allotment in the West Indian snake, Alsophis rufiventris (Colubridae). Herpetol. Bull. (89): 22–25. 
  40. Heinz, H.M., A.Z. Savit, A.Z., A.J. Maley, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2005. Alsophis rufiventris. Foraging and diet. Herpetol. Rev. 36: 186–187. 
  41. Hensley, R.L. and R. Powell. 2006. Sphaerodactylus sabanus. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (809): 1–3. 
  42. Hensley, R.L., A.Z. Savit, and R. Powell. 2006. Anolis schwartzi. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (816): 1–5. 
  43. Hensley, R.L., S.M. Wissman, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2004. Habitat preferences and abundance of Dwarf Geckos (Sphaerodactylus) on St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. Carib. J. Sci. 40: 427–429.
  44. Hite, J.L., C.A. Rodríguez Gómez, S.C. Larimer, A.M. Díaz-Lameiro, and R. Powell. 2008. Anoles of St. Vincent (Squamata: Polychrotidae): Population densities and structural habitat use. Caribbean Journal of Science 44: 102–115.
  45. Hite, J.L., D.S. Steinberg, and R. Powell. 2008. Sphaerodactylus kirbyi. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (852): 1–2.
  46. Howard, A.K., J.D. Forester, J.M. Ruder, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1999. Natural history of a terrestrial Hispaniolan anole: Anolis barbouri. J. Herpetol. 33: 702–706. 
  47. Howard, A.K., J.D. Forester, J.M. Ruder, and R. Powell. 1997. Diets of two syntopic frogs: Eleutherodactylus abbotti and E. armstrongi (Leptodactylidae) from the Sierra de Baoruco, Hispaniola. Herpetol. Nat. Hist. 5(1): 77–82. 
  48. Howard, K.G., J.M. Eaton, S.C. Larimer, and J.H. Townsend. 2001. Geographic distribution: Alsophis rijgersmaei. Herpetol. Rev. 32:121. 
  49. Howard, K.G., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2001. Natural history of the edificarian geckos Hemidactylus mabouia, Thecadactylus rapicauda, and Sphaerodactylus sputator on Anguilla. Carib. J. Sci. 37: 285–288. 
  50. Huntington, C. and G.L. Cisper. 1994. A new host and locality record for Eimeria leiocephali (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina) with comments on the type-host. Carib. J. Sci. 30: 152. 
  51. Huntington, C., G. Cisper, D.D. Smith, R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and A. Lathrop. 1996. Two new Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Amphisbaena manni (Amphisbaenia: Amphisbaenidae) in the Dominican Republic. Carib. J. Sci. 32: 50–53. 
  52. Huntington, C., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., G.L. Cisper, D.D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1997. Two new Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina) from Ameiva spp. (Lacertilia: Teiidae) in the Dominican Republic. Rev. Brasileira Biol. 57: 11–14. 
  53. John, R.R., E.J. Bentz, M.J. Rivera Rodríguez, A.M. Bauer, and R. Powell. 2012. Bachia heteropa. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (894): 1–9.
  54. John, R.R., H.D. Hedman, and R. Powell. 2012. Anolis aeneus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (892): 1–11.
  55. John, R.R.,M.J. Rivera Rodríguez, E.J. Bentz, M.E. Gifford, and R. Powell. 2011. Bachia heteropa alleni (Earless Worm Lizard). Escape and digging behaviors. Herpetological Review 42: 92.
  56. John, R.R., M.J. Rivera Rodríguez, E.J. Bentz, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2012. Gonatodes daudini. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (895): 1–2.
  57. Joyce, T., D.A. Eifler, and R. Powell. 2010. Variable habitat use influences the mating system of a Lesser Antillean anole. Amphibia-Reptilia 31: 395–401.
  58. Kerr, A.M., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2005. Ameiva erythrocephala (Teiidae) on Sint Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles: Baseline data on a small population in a severely altered habitat. Carib. J. Sci. 41: 162–169. 
  59. Kerr, A.M., V.H. Zero , and R. Powell. 2006. Ameiva erythrocephala. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (817): 1–4.
  60. Larimer, S.C. , R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2006. Effects of structural habitat on the escape behavior of the lizard, Anolis gingivinus . Amphibia-Reptilia 27: 569–574. 
  61. Lenart, L.A., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis armouri. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (607): 1–3. 
  62. Lenart, L.A., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D.D. Smith. 1997. Anoline diversity in three differentially altered habitats in the Sierra de Baoruco, República Dominicana, Hispaniola. Biotropica 29: 117–123. 
  63. Lenart, L.A., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., D.D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1994 (1995). The diet and a gastric parasite of Anolis armouri, a cybotoid anole from montane pine forests in southern Hispaniola. Herpetol. Nat. Hist. 2(2): 97–100. 
  64. Lenart, L.A. and S.P. Sowell. 1996. Anoline diversity in three differentially altered habitats in the Sierra de Baoruco, Dominican Republic, Hispaniola (abstracts in English, Spanish, and French), pp. 442–443. In R. Powell and R.W. Henderson (eds.), Contributions to West Indian Herpetology: A Tribute to Albert Schwartz. Soc. Study Amphib. Rept. Contrib. Herpetol., vol. 12. Ithaca, New York. 
  65. Lynxwiler, J.R., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D.D. Smith. 1991. Notes on the natural history of Hemidactylus brookii haitianus from the Dominican Republic. Dactylus 1(1): 2–9. 
  66. Maley, A.J. 2004. Species profile: Alsophis rufiventris. Iguana (J. Intl. Iguana Soc.) 11: 147. 
  67. Maley, A.J., A.Z. Savit, H.M. Heinz, R. Powell, and R.W. Henderson. 2006. Alsophis rufiventris. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (818): 1–4. 
  68. Mallery, C.S., Jr. , M.A. Marcum , R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R.W. Henderson. 2007. Herpetofaunal communities of the leeward slopes and coasts of St. Vincent: A comparison of sites variously altered by human activity. Appl. Herpetol. 4: 313–325.
  69. Marcum, M.A., M.A. Powell, A.J. Muensch, H.F. Arnold, and R. Powell. 2008. Social behaviour of the dwarf gecko Sphaerodactylus vincenti vincenti on St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles. Salamandra 44: 15–22.
  70. McTaggart, A.L., D.P. Quinn, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. A rapid assessment of reptilian diversity on Union Island, St. Vincent and the Grenadines. South American Journal of Herpetology 6: 59–65.
  71. Micco, S.M., G.J. Lahey, R.A. Sosa, R. Powell, E.J. Censky, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1997 (1998). Natural history of Leiocephalus barahonensis (Tropiduridae) on the Península de Barahona, Hispaniola: an examination of two populations. Herpetol. Nat. Hist. 5: 147–156. 
  72. Medina Díaz, P., H.M. Heinz, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2005. Population densities and structural habitats of Anolis lizards on St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. Carib. J. Sci. 41: 296–306. 
  73. Moster, J.A., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis brevirostris. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (610): 1–4. 
  74. Moster, J.A., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., D.D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1992. Natural history notes on a small population of Anolis brevirostris (Sauria: Polychridae) from altered habitat in the Dominican Republic. Bull. Maryland Herpetol. Soc. 28: 150–161. 
  75. Muelleman, P.J., L.A. White, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2009. Activity patterns of Alsophis sibonius and Liophis juliae (Dipsadidae) in Cabrits National Park, Dominica, West Indies. South American Journal of Herpetology 4: 55–60. 
  76. Muñiz Pagan, D.N., M.E. Gifford, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 2012. Ecological performance in the actively foraging lizard Ameiva ameiva (Teiidae). Journal of Herpetology 46: 253–256.
  77. Nava, S.S., K.V.D. Hodge, J.J. Shew, and R. Powell. 2001. Geographic distribution: Sphaerodactylus sputator. Herpetol. Rev. 32: 121. 
  78. Nava, S.S., C.R. Lindsay, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2001. Microhabitat, activity, and density of a dwarf gecko (Sphaerodactylus parvus) on Anguilla, West Indies. Amphibia-Reptilia 22: 455–464. 
  79. Nava, S.S., C.R. Lindsay, R. Powell, and R.W. Henderson. 2002. Sphaerodactylus parvus. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (752): 1–2. 
  80. Nava, S.S., J.J. Shew, and R. Powell. 2001. Geographic distribution: Sphaerodactylus parvus. Herpetol. Rev. 32: 120–121.
  81. Nelson, S.E., B.L. Banbury, R.A. Sosa, and R. Powell. 2001. Natural history of Leiocephalus semilineatus in association with sympatric Leiocephalus schreibersii and Ameiva lineolata. Contemp. Herpetol. 2001(1): 1–6 + 4 figs. + 2 tables ( http://www.cnah.org/ch/ch/2001/1/index.htm). 
  82. Nelson, S.E. and R. Powell, R. 2002. Leiocephalus semilineatus. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (751): 1–2. 
  83. Pasachnik, S.A., J.J. Shew, J.H. Townsend, and R. Powell. 2002. Iguana delicatissima. Activity. Herpetol. Rev. 33: 51–52. 
  84. Pasachnik, S.A., M. Breuil, and R. Powell. 2006. Iguana delicatissima. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (811): 1–14. 
  85. Poche, A.J., Jr., R. Powell, and R.W. Henderson. 2005. Sleep-site selection and fidelity in Grenadian anoles (Reptilia: Squamata: Polychrotidae). Schlafplatzwahl und -treue bei Echsen der Gattung Anolisaus Grenada (Reptilia: Squamata: Polychrotidae). Herpetozoa 18: 3–10.
  86. Powell, M.A., R. Powell, and R.W. Henderson. 2006. Anolis sabanus. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (815): 1–5.
  87. Powell, R., J.H. Greve, and A.K. Howard. 1998. Hispaniolan Eleutherodactylus (Anura: Leptodactylidae) as hosts of immature Terranova (Nematoda: Ascarididae), with notes on additional nematodes. Carib. J. Sci. 34: 155–157. 
  88. Powell, R., P.J. Hall, D.D. Smith, and J. Riley. 1993. The occurrence of Raillietiella sp. (Pentastomida: Cephalobaenida) in Hemidactylus haitianus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae) from Hispaniola. Dactylus 2: 51–53. 
  89. Powell, R. and R.W. Henderson. 2005. A new species of Gonatodes (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from the West Indies. Carib. J. Sci. 41: 709–715.
  90. Powell, R. and R.W. Henderson. 2008. Exploitation of the night-light niche by a Dominican Racer. Iguana 15: 156–157. 
  91. Powell, R., R.W. Henderson, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2005. Reptiles and Amphibians of the Dutch Caribbean: St. Eustatius, Saba, and St. Maarten. St. Eustatius National Parks Foundation, Gallows Bay, St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. 
  92. Powell, R., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., L.R. White, and D.D. Smith. 1992. Notes on neonate Tropidophis haetianus (Squamata: Serpentes: Tropidophiidae) from Hispaniola. Bull. Chicago Herpetol. Soc. 27: 116–117. 
  93. Powell, S.D. , M.L. Treglia , R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. Treeboas in the West Indies: Responses of Corallus cookii and C. grenadensis to disturbed habitats, pp. 374–387. In R.W. Henderson and R. Powell (eds.), Biology of the Boas and Pythons. Eagle Mountain Publishing LC, Eagle Mountain, Utah. 
  94. Queral, A., R. Garcia, R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., D.D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1995. Agonistic responses by a grass anole, Anolis olssoni from the Dominican Republic, to male conspecifics. Amphibia-Reptilia 16: 313–321. 
  95. Quinn, D.P., A.L. McTaggart, T.A. Bellah, E.J. Bentz, L.G. Chambers, H.D. Hedman, R.R. John, D.N. Muñiz Pagan, and M.J. Rivera Rodríguez. 2010. The reptiles of Union Island, St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Reptiles & Amphibians 17: 222–233.
  96. Quinn, D.P., A.L. McTaggart, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. Corallus grenadensis (Grenada Bank Treeboa, Congo Snake). Habitat and abundance. Herpetological Review 42: 438.
  97. Ramos, Y.M. and R. Powell. 2001. Anolis chlorocyanus. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (728): 1–6. 
  98. Ramos, Y.M. and R. Powell. 2001. Anolis coelestinus. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (729): 1–5. 
  99. Rivera Rodríguez, M.J., E.J. Bentz, R.R. John, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. Mastigodryas bruesi (Windward Tree Racer, White Snake). Miscellaneous behaviors. Herpetological Review 42: 293–294.
  100. Rivera Rodríguez, M.J., E.J. Bentz, R.R. John, and R. Powell. 2011. Intraspecific and intergeneric behavioural interactions of Sphaerodactylus kirbyi and Gonatodes daudini (Squamata: Sphaerodactylidae) on Union Island, St. Vincent and Grenadines. Salamandra 47: 9–16 (plus cover photograph).
  101. Rivera Rodríguez, M.J., E.J. Bentz, D.P. Scantlebury, R.R. John, D.P. Quinn, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2011. Rediscovery of the Grenada Bank Endemic, Typhlops tasymicris(Squamata: Typhlopidae). Journal of Herpetology 45: 167–168.
  102. Ruder, J.M., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1995. Eleutherodactylus rufifemoralis. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (601): 1–2. 
  103. Rudman, S.M. and R. Powell. 2009. Typhlops dominicanus. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (879): 1–3. 
  104. Rudman, S.M., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2009. Ameiva fuscata (Dominican Ground Lizard). Arboreal activity and diet. Herpetological Review 40: 219. 
  105. Rudman, S.M., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2009. Ameiva fuscata on Dominica, Lesser Antilles: Natural history and interactions with Anolis oculatus. Herpetological Bulletin (109): 17–24 (plus cover photograph).
  106. Sander, J.M., J.M. Germano, R. Powell, and R.W. Henderson. 2003. Colour and pattern polymorphism in Eleutherodactylus johnstonei on Grenada. Herpetological Bulletin (83): 22–25. 
  107. Sander, J.M., H. Kaiser, and R. Powell. 2003. Eleutherodactylus euphronides. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (764): 1–3.
  108. Savit, A.Z. 2004. [Review of:] Lizards: Windows to the Evolution of Diversity, by E.R. Pianka and L.J. Vitt. Iguana 11: 183–184.
  109. Savit, A.Z., A.J. Maley, H.M. Heinz, R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2005. Distribution and activity periods of Alsophis rufiventris (Colubridae) on The Quill, St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. Amphibia-Reptilia 26: 418–421. 
  110. Schell, P.T., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1993. Ameiva chrysolaema. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (563): 1–6. 
  111. Schell, P.T., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D.D. Smith. 1993. Natural history of Ameiva chrysolaema (Sauria: Teiidae) from Barahona, Dominican Republic. Copeia 1993: 859–862. 
  112. Schneider, K.R., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. Escape behavior of Anolis lizards from the Sierra de Baoruco, Dominican Republic. Carib. J. Sci. 36: 321–323. 
  113. Schreiber, M.C., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1995. Leiocephalus schreibersii. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (613): 1–4. 
  114. Schreiber, M.C., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D.D. Smith. 1993. Natural history of a small population of Leiocephalus schreibersii (Sauria: Tropiduridae) from altered habitat in the Dominican Republic. Florida Sci. 56: 18–27. 
  115. Shew, J.J., E.J. Censky, and R. Powell. 2002. Ameiva corvina. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (747): 1–2. 
  116. Shew, J.J., S.C. Larimer, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2002. Sleeping patterns and sleep-site fidelity of Anolis gingivinus on Anguilla. Carib. J. Sci. 38: 136–138. 
  117. Sifers, S.M., M.L. Yeska, and R. Powell. 2001. Eleutherodactylus abbotti. Pattern polymorphism. Herpetol. Rev. 32: 180–181. 
  118. Sifers, S.M., M.L. Yeska, Y.M. Ramos, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2001. Anolis lizards restricted to altered edge habitats in a Hispaniolan cloud forest. Carib. J. Sci. 37: 55–62. 
  119. Simmons, P.M., B.T. Greene, K.E. Williamson, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2005. Ecological interactions within a lizard community on Grenada. Herpetologica 61: 124–134. 
  120. Smith, D.D., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., R. Powell, L.R. White, and A. Lathrop. 1991. Tropidophis haetianus. Locomotion. Herpetol. Rev. 22: 132–133. 
  121. Smith, D.D., R. Powell, P.A. Zani, and A. Lathrop. 1991. Osteopilus dominicensis. Behavior. Herpetol. Rev. 22: 129. 
  122. Smith, D.D., P.T. Schell, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1994. Pharyngeal myiasis by sarcophagid larvae (Diptera) in Ameiva chrysolaema (Sauria: Teiidae) from the Dominican Republic. Carib. J. Sci. 30: 148–149. 
  123. Smith, J.W., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis olssoni. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (611): 1–5. 
  124. Smith, J.W., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., D.D. Smith, and A. Lathrop. 1994. Natural history notes on a population of Anolis olssoni (Sauria: Polychrotidae) from the Dominican Republic. Bull. Maryland Herpetol. Soc. 30: 67–75. 
  125. Sosa, R.A., R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 1995. Hypsirhynchus, H. ferox. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (617): 1–4. 
  126. Sowell, S.P., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1995. Anolis bahorucoensis. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (608): 1–3. 
  127. Sproston, A.L., R.E. Glor, L.M. Hartley, E.J. Censky, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 1999. Niche differences among three sympatric species of Ameiva (Reptilia: Teiidae) on Hispaniola. J. Herpetol. 33: 131–136. 
  128. Sproston, A.L., J.H. Greve, and R. Powell. 1997. Ameiva chrysolaema ficta. Parasitism. Herpetol. Rev. 28: 201. 
  129. Sproston, A.L., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee. 1998. Ameiva leberi. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (670): 1–2.
  130. Steinberg, D.S., J.L. Hite, R. Powell, and R.W. Henderson. 2008. Sphaerodactylus vincenti. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (853): 1–6.
  131. Steinberg, D.S. , S.D. Powell , R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R.W. Henderson. 2007. Population densities, water loss rates, and diets of Sphaerodactylus vincenti on St. Vincent, West Indies. J. Herpetol. 41: 326–332. 
  132. Townsend, J.H., J.M. Eaton, R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R.W. Henderson. 2000. Cuban treefrogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis) in Anguilla, Lesser Antilles. Carib. J. Sci. 36: 326–328. 
  133. Townsend, J.H., R. Powell, and R.W. Henderson. 2000. Alsophis rijgersmaei. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (717): 1–3. 
  134. Treglia, M.L. 2006. An Annotated Checklist of the Amphibians and Reptiles of St. Vincent, West Indies. Iguana 13: 251–262.
  135. Treglia, M.L., A.J. Muensch, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2008. Invasive Anolis sagrei on St. Vincent and its potential impact on perch heights of Anolis trinitatis. Caribbean Journal of Science 44: 251–256.
  136. Turk, P.A., N.N. Wyszynski, and R. Powell. 2010. Iguana delicatissima (Lesser Antillean Iguana). Display behavior. Herpetological Review 41: 79–80.
  137. Turk, P.A., N.N. Wyszynski, R. Powell , and R.W. Henderson. 2010. Population densities and water-loss rates of Gymnophthalmus pleii, Gymnophthalmus underwoodi, and Sphaerodactylus fantasticus fugaon Dominica, West Indies. Salamandra 46: 125–130.
  138. White, A.M., E.J. Censky, and R. Powell. 2002. Ameiva corax. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (746): 1–2. 
  139. White, A.M., R. Powell, and E.J. Censky. 2002. On the thermal biology of Ameiva (Teiidae) from the Anguilla Bank, West Indies: Does melanism matter? Amphibia-Reptilia 23: 517–523. 
  140. White, L.A. and P.J. Muelleman. 2008. Juvenile pattern and ontogenetic pattern changes in Dominican Racers. Iguana 15: 157–159. 
  141. White, L.R., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1992. Typhlops syntherus. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (551): 1–2. 
  142. White, L.R. and R. Powell. 1996. Celestus agasepsoides. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (627): 1–2. 
  143. White, L.R., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., A. Lathrop, and D.D. Smith. 1992. Food habits of three syntopic reptiles from the Barahona Peninsula, Hispaniola. J. Herpetol. 26: 518–520. 
  144. Williamson, K.E., A.J. Poche, Jr., B.T. Greene, B.R. Harris, J.M. Germano, P.M. Simmons, D.T. Yorks, R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R.W. Henderson. 2002. Herpetofauna of Hog Island, Grenada. Herpetol. Bull. (82): 26–29. 
  145. Williamson, K.E. and R. Powell. 2004. Gymnophthalmus underwoodi. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (793): 1–5. 
  146. Wissmann, S.M., R.L. Hensley, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2005. Social behaviour in the dwarf geckos Sphaerodactylus sabanus and S. sputator from St. Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles. Salamandra 41: 45–50. 
  147. Yeska, M.L., R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2000. The lizards of Cayo Pisaje, Dominican Republic, Hispaniola. Herpetol. Rev. 31: 18–20.
  148. Yorks, D.T., R.W. Henderson, and R. Powell. 2003. Typhlops tasymicris. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. (780): 1–2.
  149. Yorks, D.T., K.E. Williamson, R.W. Henderson, R. Powell, and J.S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2004. Foraging behavior in the arboreal boid Corallus grenadensis. Stud. Neotrop. Fauna Environ. 38: 167–172. 
  150. Zani, P.A., S.I. Guttman, and R. Powell. 1993. The genetic relations of Anolis cristatellus (Sauria: Polychridae) from Hispaniola and Puerto Rico. Carib. J. Sci. 29: 250–253. 
  151. Zero, V.H., D.A. Eifler, and R. Powell. 2009. Foraging behavior of the lizard Ameiva erythrocephala. Herpetozoa 22: 167–171.
  152. Zippel, K.C., J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., and R. Powell. 1994. Ialtris dorsalis. Cat. Amer. Amph. Rept. (592): 1–3. 
  153. Zippel, K.C., R. Powell, J.S. Parmerlee, Jr., S. Monks, A. Lathrop, and D.D. Smith. 1996. The distribution of larval Eutrombicula alfreddugesi (Acari: Trombiculidae) infesting Anolis lizards (Lacertilia: Polychrotidae) from different habitats on Hispaniola. Carib. J. Sci. 32: 43–49.

 

2012 REU Program

Natural History of a West Indian Herpetofauna: Eleuthera (Bahamas)

Location of the Cape Eleuthera Institute on Eleuthera in the Bahamas

The Cape Eleuthera Institute, where we will be staying, is adjacent to the Island School, where we will be dining and whose facilities will be available for our use.

A peninsula adjacent to the Cape Eleuthera Institute might serve as a field site for some studies.

Tarpum Bay is another possible field study site..

The southernmost tip of Eleuthera is a windswept complex of habitats (beaches, cliffs, scrub vegetation) supporting populations of LeiocephalusAmeiva, and Anolis.

Rocky outcrops along the western beaches of Cape Eleuthera will serve as the primary field site for studies of Leiocephalus carinatus.

WHEN AND WHERE?

The program begins at Avila University in Kansas City, Missouri on Monday, 21 May 2012 and ends on Friday, 27 July 2012.

The three-week field trip to Eleuthera will be in June 2012. 

 

ELIGIBILITY

The program is open to undergraduates currently enrolled in an accredited two- or four-year college or university who will not graduate before December 2012.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

Applicants should have taken at least one science course and have an interest in pursuing a career in the natural sciences.

 

BENEFITS

The program will provide a $4500 stipend, all expenses associated with the field trip, and on-campus lodging for non-resident students.

An additional $800 is available for an accepted student residing outside the continental United States.

 

COSTS

Participants are financially responsible for travel to and from Kansas City, food while at Avila University, and tuition (at a reduced rate).

 

CREDIT

Students may earn up to 6 hrs of credit in biology research.

 

SENIOR FACULTY

Robert Powell, Professor of Biology, Avila University

Bob Powell with Mastigodryas bruesi on St. Vincent.

John S. Parmerlee, Jr., Adjunct Professor of Biology, Johnson County Community College

John Parmerlee with a Turnip-tailed Gecko (Thecadactylus rapicauda).

Robert W. Henderson, Curator of Amphibians and Reptiles, Milwaukee Public Museum

"Boa" Bob Henderson examining a Clouded Boa (Boa nebulosa) in Dominica.

Matthew E. Gifford, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Arkansas-Little Rock

Matt Gifford talking to Pathfinders from Tortola about his research on Puerto Rican Ground Lizards (Ameiva exsul) on Guana, British Virgin Islands.

Douglas Eifler, Natural Resources Liaison, Haskell Indian Nations University

Doug Eiffler with lizard noose in hand chasing Ground Agamas (Agama aculeata) in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, Botswana, for a behavioral study. Photograph by Kanke Pan.

 

PROGRAM

Learn: (1) how to use the primary literature, (2) methods of field research, (3) computer applications (word processing, data analysis, graphics, presentations), (4) statistical data analysis, (5) writing for professional journals, (6) how to choose a graduate program, and (7) how to apply successfully to the graduate program of your choice.

Seminars: (1) natural and political history of the Bahamas, (2) political and economic realities in a developing nation, (3) tropical biology and conservation efforts in Caribbean nations, (4) how to write for science, (5) using a research library, (6) the role of natural history museums in biological research, (7) selection and application to graduate programs, and (8) ethics in biology and conservation.

 

POSSIBLE RESEARCH PROJECTS

Habitat Use, Performance, and Time Budgets of Curlytail Lizards (Leiocephalus carinatus)

 

  

 

 

 

Much of our research on this trip will address the relationships between natural history traits and measures of performance in Curlytail Lizards.

 

Natural History, Habitat Use, and Population Densities of Ground Li

Herpetology of Navassa Island

 
Recommended links for herpetological information

 
DO NOT USE ANY PHOTOGRAPHS WITHOUT PERMISSION!
Having said that... Webmasters, if you are operating a free web site you are welcome to use my pictures. However, you must contact me first to let me know your URL and which pictures you are using. In addition, I must be credited as the photographer wherever the pictures appear. Thanks.

 

All Robert Powell

Robert Powell

Robert Powell, Ph.D.

Professor of Biology
Phone: 816.501.2440 
Fax : 816.501.2457 
Robert.Powell@avila.edu

A Century of Inspiration

Celebrate Avila's first 100 years. Click above to watch the video.

Teaching Philosophy

My teaching philosophy is best summarized as a composite of three basic statements ...
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Research Interests

In recent years my research interests have been focused primarily on the Hispaniolan herpetofauna ... 
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Essay

“On Being a Herpetologist at a Small, Private, Undergraduate College”
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